Science Fiction Fridays: Exposed to the elements

As the wind blows, the rain falls and snow looks to be on our horizon, here are three books that feature the elements, in their many forms and iterations.

people of the raven kathleen gearPeople of the Raven by Kathleen O’Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear

The Raven people and the Northwind people become locked in an epic battle for survival as shifting climate change makes resources ever scarcer. This book, set in a pre-history Washington State, uses the archeological discovery of the Kennewick Man to spin a “What if…?” tale full of suspense, mystery and warfare. The Gears show their usual attention to details as they create a world rich in characters and history.

Unnatural Issue by Mercedes Lackeyunnatural issue

Susanne is shunned by her father and raised by the servants of the manor after being disowned by her father who blames her for her mother’s death during childbirth. However, her father begins experimenting with the dark powers of necromancy to use his daughter to resurrect his wife, but Susanne isn’t exactly powerless herself… A historical fantasy that takes a dark fairy tale and puts it into the background of WWI. It’s a fine tale for those that like interesting magic and a plucky female lead. A standalone in Lackey’s Elemental Masters series.

runelords sum of all men david farlandThe Runelords: The Sum of All Men by David Farland

On his way to ask the beautiful Princess Iome for her hand in marriage, Prince Gaborn uncovers an assassination plot and subsequent war with the powerful Raj Ahten whose thousands of endowments make him a virtually invincible opponent. A dark, gritty fantasy that has shades of Robert Jordan and one of the most unique magic systems in the genre. However, it is the mysterious elementals and their clandestine power grabs that makes this book a must for this list.

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One Response to Science Fiction Fridays: Exposed to the elements

  1. While Poe is generally remembered for his gothic stories, he also extended into science fiction. In 1838, he wrote The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, his only novel-length work ever published, one with numerous scientific elements in it.

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