Novels to read during Hispanic Heritage Month

Hispanic Heritage Month, September 15th-October 15th, honors the histories, cultures and contributions of Americans with ancestry in Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. To help you celebrate through reading, our librarians put together a list of fiction by Latinx authors published between 2016-2018; see the full list and place holds in our catalog.

The Living Infinite by Chantel Acevedo
A real 19th-century Bourbon infanta is the inspiration for this novel about a princess who writes a rebellious feminist memoir. Fresh, fast-moving historical fiction from a master storyteller.

The House of Impossible Beauties by Joseph Cassara
A cast of gay and transgender kids navigate the Harlem ball scene of the 1980s and 1990s. Inspired by the House of Xtravaganza made famous in the documentary, Paris Is Burning.

The Regional Office Is Under Attack! by Manuel Gonzales
When a prophecy suggests that an insider might bring down a powerful underground organization, devoted recruit Sarah and young assassin Rose find their respective lives clashing in a dispute that threatens everything they know.

Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado
Eight stories showcase Machado’s fluency in the bizarre, magical, and sharply frightening depths of the imagination. Each of these stories has a strange and surprising idea that communicates, in a shockingly visceral way, the experience of living inside a woman’s body.

Lost Empress by Sergio de la Pava
A madcap, football-obsessed tale of crossed destinies and criminal plots gone awry.

The Air You Breathe by Frances de Pontes Peebles
Two girls from a sugar plantation in early 20th-century Brazil pursue pop stardom. Samba music and its allure beats beneath this winding and sinuous tale of ambition, memory, and identity.

What Happens In Summer by Caridad Piñeiro
Years after a failed summer fling, Jonathan and Connie are thrown together again. Their attraction is alive and well, but their fundamental differences are still getting in the way. Aren’t they?

The House of Broken Angels by Luis Alberto Urrea
Across one bittersweet weekend in their San Diego neighborhood, revelers mingle and celebrate the lives of family patriarch Miguel “Big Angel” De La Cruz and his mother, recounting the many tales that have passed into family lore.

~ posted by Andrea G.

John Wyndham’s Work Remains Scary and Thought-provoking

I love discovering authors that were impactful in their era and whose work still holds up today. Wyndham is the kind of writer I truly enjoy–he writes the kind of unfussy, competent prose that is underrated and more supple than it first appears. His writing reminds me of the work of Walter Tevis, Theodore Sturgeon, and James Tiptree, Jr. where the first lines draw you in, and the characters are drawn swiftly in compelling details without overdoing it.

Wyndham wrote short, chilling novels that he called “logical fantasy” and what were alternately and perhaps dismissively called “cosy catastrophes.” He also knew how to draw you in from the first sentence and paragraph.

Here is the first sentence in The Day of the Triffids (1951): “When a day that you happen to know is Wednesday starts off by sounding like a Sunday, there is something seriously wrong somewhere.” Continue reading “John Wyndham’s Work Remains Scary and Thought-provoking”

Book-It Repertory Theatre’s JANE EYRE: Beyond the Theatre

Charlotte Brontë’s classic novel, adapted and directed by Julie Beckman, will be playing from September 13 to October 14, 2018 at Seattle’s Book-It Repertory Theatre. Since its publication in 1847, Jane Eyre has inspired countless readers. Below are a few books and films to enhance your experience of the show:

The Secret History of Jane Eyre. by John Pfordresher
Why did Charlotte insist on hiding her authorship of JANE EYRE from everyone but her sisters? Pfordresher lays bare the painful parallels between Charlotte’s life and her novel. Continue reading “Book-It Repertory Theatre’s JANE EYRE: Beyond the Theatre”

A Lifetime of Reading Finally Pays Off!

Sure, reading has been shown to improve empathy in adults and emotional intelligence in children. Plus it’s affordable and enjoyable, and you feel, learn and experience so much. But what about making you the envy of your friends? Has reading ever bought the next round of beer? Where are the fabulous prizes?

That’s all about to change!

Introducing the Bookish Trivia Trilogy, a trio of literary trivia nights hosted in local bars this coming October 2, 8 and 16th as part of Booktobefest 2018. For the past three years, trivia buffs and newbies alike have flocked to our fun free pub trivia nights each October. This year, acceding to popular demand, we’re tilting the field in favor of the people who keep us in business: readers!  Continue reading “A Lifetime of Reading Finally Pays Off!”

Library Reads: New books for October!

We usually start these Library Reads monthly posts by saying “10 books librarians across the U.S. love …” But for October — you, dear readers, get 11 new books because there’s a bonus “Hall of Fame Author” included this month.  AND four of these titles — from Tana French, Barbara Kingsolver, Susan Orlean, Jodi Picoult — will be in our October Peak Picks collections at all our branches. (Peak Picks = No holds, no wait. Look for the display at your favorite branch!)

And here are the 11 new books for October 2018’s Library Reads:

The Proposal by Jasmine Guillory:  A disastrous public wedding proposal results in a chance meeting between Nik and Carlos. What follows is a delightfully humorous and sweet story about two people falling for each other while remaining seemingly unaware of their blossoming romance. The book sets itself apart by portraying a self-aware, feminist woman who enjoys positive relationships with female friends. An engaging and upbeat multicultural romance. ~ LaNiesha Bowles, Boston Public Library, Boston, MA Continue reading “Library Reads: New books for October!”