Crime: Macavity Macavity… Award-winning mysteries.

Most crime readers are aware that there are mystery awards – the Edgars, right? – but not everyone knows just how many awards there Image of cat courtesy of Forty Two, via Flickr.are. There are the Agatha Awards for best domestic mystery; the Shamus Awards for detective novels; Britain’s Dagger Awards, and many, many more. And for a quarter of a century, the Mystery Readers International’s Macavity Awards (named after a certain mystery cat); think of it as the Golden Globes of crime. This year’s awards were give at Bouchercon, the annual mystery convention named in honor of mystery author and editor Anthony Boucher, a master of the locked-room whodunnit. (I once spoke at a Bouchercon up in Anchorage, Alaska, where was very excited to get a close up view of many famous crime writers, and a moose.) Here are the winners and runners up, a great cross section of 2011’s best crime fiction:

Find Sara Gran's "Claire DeWitt and the City of the Dead" in the Seattle Public Library catalog.Best Mystery Novel: Claire DeWitt and the City of the Dead by Sara Gran. In this series debut Gran perfectly captures the surreal gumbo of dreamy dreams and sleazy schemes that is post Katrina New Orleans. A truly original series. Gran’s fellow nominees in this category were:

Find Leonard Rosen's "All Cry Chaos" in the Seattle Public Library catalog.Best First Mystery Novel: All Cry Chaos by Leonard Rosen. Murder, international intrigue, schemes for global domination, and …mathematics? Yep: Rosen pulls of a neat trick in this brainy thriller. Rosen’s fellow nominees in this category were:

Find Catrionia McPherson's "Dandy Gilver and the Proper Treatment of Blood Stains" in the Seattle Public Library catalog.Sue Feder Memorial Historical Mystery: Dandy Gilver and the Proper Treatment of Bloodstains by Catriona McPherson. In this traditional cozy set in 1920s Edinburgh, McPherson unleashes a delightful cast of suspects in a classic locked room murder. McPherson’s fellow nominees in this category were:

Best Mystery Related Non-Fiction: The Sookie Stackhouse Companion, edited by Charlaine Harris. Harris’ fellow nominees were:

On an unrelated note, I was on a panel recently at the Taproot Theatre with Michael Gruber, Bernadette Pajer and John Longenbaugh entitled Clues for Life: Lessons Learned from the Mystery Novel. We had a great time: here’s the podcast.

This entry was posted in BOOKS, Mystery and Crime and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s