Just because Women’s History Month is over….

RuthMcGuire
…doesn’t mean that you can’t go on reading about the heroines of our past!  I read a lot of non-fiction, and I can testify that it isn’t necessarily turgid and boring.  Many biographies and histories center around a gripping story and read like fiction, and there are also the joys of well-written and humorous prose.  Here are some options for keeping your women’s history connection going beyond March, with some books that are, first and foremost, great reads!

(But first, this picture — above — from the Smithsonian Institution is of Ruth Colvin Starrett McGuire, who was a plant pathologist known for her work on sugar cane diseases).

Nothing Daunted: Two rich girls from the east coast go to teach in Colorado, in 1916, and are, amazingly, undaunted by incredible hardships.

Her Story:You’ve heard of Eleanor Roosevelt, but maybe not about these other American women who were game-changers.  Abstract algebra anyone?

Crazy Salad & Scribble Scribble: Nora Ephron, director and coauthor of “Sleepless in Seattle”, turns her hilarious and incisive lens on feminism and what it’s like to be female, among other topics.

I Still Believe Anita Hill: Whatever your view of Anita Hill’s testimony, she transformed America’s discourse and impressed many with her bravery.  This collection has pieces by a remarkable list of America’s female literary luminaries.

Englightened Sexism: From Sarah Palin to RiotGrrrl, media portrayals of women give strong messages about how women should look and behave. But, do women need to accept them, and if not, how can they rise above them?

Now, I am off to see if I can find a shirt like Ruth’s!

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