Hidden Humor

A recent blog post by Shannon Hale about funny girls getting shushed got me thinking about women writers who are really stinkin’ funny, but not usually marketed or thought of as humor writers.

Find The Importance of Being Alice in the SPL catalogThen I looked on my nightstand and saw a Katie MacAlister book.  The Importance of Being Alice is labelled a romance, the cover art is all flowy white dress, and just based on these, you would never guess how many times the words inside made me ugly-snort-laugh.  Yes, it has the structure of a romance, yes, romances can be funny, but the absurd situations, delightfully odd supporting characters, witty banter, and slapstick moments are pure comedy.  This one is a contemporary romance, but she also writes paranormals (dragons! vampires!), historicals (earls!), and some romances that defy categorization (the pirate virtual reality game one! seriously!).   So, if you don’t mind some spicy sex scenes and people falling in love, try some Katie MacAlister, she just might be your next favorite funny woman.

What hidden humorists have you found cloaked in other genres?  Is there a gumshoe that induces giggles? Funny fantasy? Witty westerns? Sci-fi that makes you snicker?

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One Response to Hidden Humor

  1. Guy says:

    I have to start with Alice, I Think (even though we only have it now in e-audio) by Susan Juby which is technically a teen book but has perceptive humor that made this adult roll in the aisles. If a YA designation scares you, her adult book, Home to Woefield, about rural BC is just as funny as Alice and could be read in conjunction with The Jesus Cow, set in rural Wisconsin, by visiting author Michael Perry. I didn’t find Goose Girl very funny, but totally believe Hale could be. MacAlister’s sardonic humor in dragon romance was way better than the plot. I’d definitely include Libba Bray’s Beauty Queens, which never gets to the beauty pageant, but is riotously funny from TV pirates to international power grabs, all on a desert island. Jane Austen, by the way, is very funny if you follow her elaborate language closely.

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