October Takeover: Fall Foods!

~posted by Selby G.

One of the best things about the fall is eating. It is the harvest season but the cold weather also makes us want warm comforting food. Hot soups, filling casseroles and baked goods galore are what the fall is all about. Here are some cookbooks to help you eat your way through fall.

Find Hot Chocolate by Turback in the SPL catalogFind Hot Chocolate by Thompson in the SPL catalogLet’s start with a drink, shall we? When the weather gets cold, a toasty beverage can warm your soul. Hot chocolate is popular with kids and adults alike. Try one of the decadent recipes in these Hot Chocolate cookbooks from Michael Turback and Fred Thompson.


Find the New Cider Maker's Handbook on the SPL catalog
Find Cider, Hard and Sweet in the SPL catalogIf you prefer your refreshments cold but with a warming touch, then maybe cider would be more to your liking. With the abundance of apples this time of year you could even try making your own. The New Cider Maker’s Handbook  and Cider, Hard and Sweet will teach you about this very American drink.

After slogging home through rain soaked leaves under a tearful sky a hot bowl of soup or other comfort food is just the thing to fill an empty belly. Chowderland by Brooke Dojny, The Soup and Bread Cookbook by Beatrice Ojakangas, Comfort Food by Rick Rodgers, and Mac & Cheese by Ellen Brown are filled with recipes perfect for the chilly evenings of autumn.

Find Chowderland in the SPL catalogFind The Soup and Bread Cookbook in the SPL catalogFind Comfort Food in the SPL catalogFind Mac & Cheese in the SPL catalog

 

 


Find The Book of Schmaltz by Thompson in the SPL catalogIf amplifying your personal insulation is paramount before the winter hits, then I suggest The Book of Schmaltz by Michael Ruhlman. Schmaltz is the Yiddish word for rendered poultry fat. This book is filled with recipes that utilize schmaltz as an ingredient, but my husband’s Bubbe (Grandmother) recommends that you just generously spread it on toast. Happy eating!

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