#BookBingoNW: published when author was under 35

Book Bingo 2019 is now underway, and we know many of you are out there pouring over your 2019 bingo cards planning what to read, so today I’m here to help you fill the “published when author was under 35” square. Here are some suggestions for fiction, nonfiction and memoir published when the author was younger than 35; you can find even more ideas in this list.

FICTION

Continue reading “#BookBingoNW: published when author was under 35”

Let’s Go Outdoors

Spring is sprung, friends, and if that means you’re looking to start hiking then we have guides to help you find trails. From urban hikes to nearby national parks, there’s a little something for everyone. Most of the guides below include information on length and difficulty of hikes, elevation gain, best seasons to hike each trail, tips for staying safe, and even assessments on how stunning the views are.

The Urban Trails series focuses on trails in or near urban areas, making it more feasible to take a few hours out of your day to get some hiking in. Check out installments for Seattle, Everett, Bellingham, Olympia and more. This series includes information on whether trails are ADA-accessible or suitable for wheelchairs, and if they’re family-friendly. Continue reading “Let’s Go Outdoors”

New Nonfiction Roundup: May 2019

Genre-busting true crime, tools for unlocking creativity, spirited defenses of liberalism and a whole lot more are coming your way this May!

Aging Backwards Fast TrackReverse aging with a 30-day program from Miranda Esmonde-White.

All the WayNFL icon Joe Namath recounts his life on and off the field on the 50th anniversary of leading the New York Jets to an unlikely Superbowl win. Continue reading “New Nonfiction Roundup: May 2019”

New Fiction Roundup, May 2019

With a trio of new releases by local authors (Chiang, McGuire, Bauermeister), a selection of contemporary romances, several short story collections, and the long awaited latest from Thomas Harris, May should have a little something for every reader.

5/7: The Bride Test by Helen Hoang – Khai Diep, on the autism spectrum, is mortified when his mother plays matchmaker and returns from a visit to Vietnam with Esme, a potential bride. A romance from the author of The Kiss Quotient. A Peak Pick!

5/7: Exhalation by Ted Chiang – Chiang’s long awaited second short story collection gathers together nine stories that examine what it means to be human, and the ways that meaning is complicated and enhanced by our experiences with ever advancing technology. A Peak Pick! Continue reading “New Fiction Roundup, May 2019”

Bus Reads for April

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time.

Here’s what I read on the bus in April:

Book cover image for FreshwaterFreshwater by Akwaeke Emezi. This book is so hard to put into words with its madness and dark tales of a person consumed by multiple identities. Born in Nigeria to parents who desperately wanted her, yet ultimately fail her, The Ada goes through life without the support system one usually has. As she travels to America for college, those selves evolve even more after she experiences a trauma. Her “identities” take her, guide her, and force her through her life – she at times fights against them, at times succumbs to their whims. Eventually as an adult it all comes to a breaking point. Such a beautiful and tragic read…I couldn’t put it down. The author does an amazing job of making the identities full-blown characters, and with the description of their world within The Ada and beyond. Continue reading “Bus Reads for April”