A Region of Makers

We are a region of makers, artists, renegades, foodies, and punks. When you throw all that together we have some of the best markets to explore all that can be imagined! From the bigger markets like Renegade Craft, Urban Craft Uprising, and The Great Junk Hunt to more localized markets like Georgetown Night Market, Chinatown ID Night Market, and Black Arts Love.

Tacoma Night Market at Alma Mater

Some of my favorite markets have been the night markets in Tacoma and Gig Harbor. Summer is also the best time to check out artisans at the summer festivals like Magnolia Summerfest and Lake City Summer Festival. Feeling really adventurous head down (or up) to Portland Night Market in Portland, Oregon or Richmond Night Market in Richmond, BC!

Want to get creative at the library? Join us at these events!

Mighty Powerful Cactus: A 3D Ornament: Learn about the fascinating world of Cacti by making a 3-D felt ornament with local teaching artist Amaranta Sandys. Observe 3 different types of live cactus before as you plan your project. Then create a quick sketch with pencil as a reference as you learn basic embroidery stitches to form a small cactus ornament that will be filled up with fluffy white stuffing. For ages 13+.

Felt Craft Fun: Interested in learning how to make felt crafts? Come to the Library’s free craft workshop! We will provide supplies and patterns. Music will be provided by a local DJ. Best for ages 8 and up.

Art Workshop With Romson Bustillo: How does life begin to change when we get involved with one another? Join Seattle artist Romson Bustillo for his beautiful exploration of togetherness and social change in “Proximity Modifier Project IV,” a community project uniquely designed for select SPL library branches. Bustillo’s art looks at how neighbors and organizations, like libraries, share space together. Drop by to make art with Romson and to find out how libraries can be places where we get to know one another by getting creative!

Art on the Plaza: Get ready! This August the Central Library’s 4th Avenue plaza will have four incredible FREE art programs on select Wednesdays. Don’t miss great music, dance performances, drop-in art making, an exciting selection of summer reading and entertainment. All ages.

       ~posted by Kara P.

“From the Archives of ZAPP” on Display Now at Central Library

From the Archives of ZAPPAn exhibition showcasing highlights for the ZAPP (Zine Archive and Publishing Project) zine collections is now on view in the Level 8 Gallery at Central Library. “From the Archives of ZAPP” runs through August 31, 2019 and showcases a small fraction of the cultural treasures found in the ZAPP zine collection, focusing on locally made zines and self-published comics, riot grrrl zines, zines representing voices from traditionally marginalized communities, and zines featuring unique and creative design elements.

ZAPP was a volunteer-run organization dedicated to preserving and promoting self-publishing in Seattle and beyond. Originally part of Richard Hugo House (who donated the collection to SPL), ZAPP collected and maintained a library of over 30,000 zines, minicomics and other self-published and small press titles.

We are hosting a few events in conjunction with the exhibit: two guided tours of the exhibit and ZAPP zine collection, a zine making workshop, and a screening of the zine documentary “$100 & A T-Shirt.”

Much of the material featured in the exhibit was originally curated in partnership with North Seattle College’s Gallery Coordinator Amanda Knowles and Professor Kelda Martensen and displayed at North Seattle College Art Gallery.

The complete ZAPP zine collection is housed on Level 7 of Central Library across from the elevators. The zine collection is open to the public every Wednesday between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Librarians at the Seattle Public Library created this list of resources to help you learn about zines, zine culture, and how to make your own zine with these resources.

~posted by Richard V.

Library Reads for August 2019

Here are twelve books coming out in August that librarians across the country are loving. Library Reads usually features 10 books each month, but this time you get two bonus books by authors who are “alums” of Library Reads. Here you go:

The Right Swipe by Alisha Rai: An intelligent, multicultural contemporary romance. Rhi, CEO of the Crush dating app, and Samson, NFL star, embark on a joint project that turns into more than just talk. Issues of #MeToo in the tech industry and the NFL’s concussion problem are woven in. For readers of the Forbidden Heart series, Elle Wright, and Alyssa Cole. Jessica Werner, The Seattle Public Library

Ellie and the Harpmaker by Hazel Prior: When Ellie walks into the Harp Barn, her life is bound to change. Dan the harpmaker is a sensitive soul who gives Ellie a harp. Ellie’s husband Clive thinks the gift is inappropriate and doesn’t support her desire to play, so she takes lessons behind his back. An engaging and tender book for fans of Fredrik Backman and Graeme Simsion. ~ Kathleen Harriott, Punta Gorda Public Library, Punta Gorda, FL

Inland by Tea Obreht: Obreht lays a mythical voice over an already dreamlike landscape of drought in Arizona. A mother and half-grown sons generate a powerful dynamic not often explored, and the youngest, who knows about scary beasts, brings magic and intuition. A journey into a barren world, inside and out. For fans of Larry Watson and Alice Hoffman. ~ Katherine Phenix, Rangeview Library District, Adams County, CO

The Last Widow by Karin Slaughter:  A fast-paced thriller in the Will Trent series has Will and Sara trying to prevent a deadly epidemic. The book tells the story of what is happening to three different people during the same short time periods, as they are unaware of the actions of the others. For readers who enjoy Tana French and John Sanford. ~ Susanne Guide, Union County Public Library, Liberty, IN

Life and Other Inconveniences by Kristan Higgins: Explores the complex relationships between caregivers and their children, as four generations of one family reflect on their past, and the failing health of the family matriarch looms large. For readers who like fully developed characters with real-world problems, and fans of Jennifer Weiner and Susan Elizabeth Phillips. ~ Amanda Kowalcze, Green Hills Public Library District, Palos Hills, IL

Sapphire Flames by Ilona Andrews: The fifth Hidden Legacy paranormal adventure requires middle sister Catalina, now head of House Baylor, to use all her skills and poise to make the right decisions for herself and her family. For fans of Nalini Singh’s Psy/Changeling series and Patricia Briggs’ Moon Called.  ~Lynne Welch, Herrick Memorial Library, Wellington, OH

The Swallows by Lisa Lutz: A dark, satirical book that centers around a school and the revenge that we seek in times of humiliation. It’s a twisty read that will have you following an investigation filled with secrets, lies, and threats. For readers who liked Prep by Curtis Sittenfeld and Small Admissions by Amy Poeppel. ~ Kathryn Neal, Skiatook Library, Skiatook, OK

Things You Save in a Fire by Katherine Center: A traumatic event as a young woman has left firefighter Cassie with a hard shell which breaks apart as she learns about forgiveness, love, and friendship. With gripping firefighting scenes and a love story, this is perfect for fans of Jo Jo Moyes or Marissa de los Santos. ~ Alissa Williams, Morton Public Library, Morton, IL

The Warehouse by Rob Hart: Paxton and Zinnia are new employees at Cloud where they work, live, and have their productivity and location tracked through their smartwatches. Gibson is the dying industrialist who created the Cloud company and is touring the country visiting his facilities. This near-future dystopian sci-fi thriller made me leery of ever shopping online again. For fans of The Circle by Dave Eggers and Notes from the Internet Apocalypse by Wayne Gladstone. ~ Dan Brooks, Wake County Public Library, Raleigh, NC

The Whisper Man by Alex North: Tom and his son Jake move to Featherbank to rebuild their life after the death of Tom’s wife; unknown to them, the town has a dark history and another little boy has gone missing and Jake begins to hear whispers in his new house. For fans of Joe Hill and Paul Tremblay. ~ Jennifer Winberry, Hunterdon County Library, Flemington, NJ

The Perfect Wife by JP Delaney: Abbie wakes up with no memory of how she ended up in the hospital. Her tech wizard husband tells her that after a horrific accident, he spent five years trying to bring her back. But is Abbie’s return a miracle of science, or a nightmare? Delaney’s latest psychological thriller keeps you guessing. ~Joan Meis Wilson, Needles Public Library, Needles, CA

The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware: Rowan travels to northern Scotland to nanny for a rich, eccentric family; a seemingly perfect job until everything unravels. The isolated location, creepy gothic vibe, unreliable narrator, and brilliant twists keep readers on edge from start to finish in a pulse-pounding read. ~ Cyndi Larsen, Avon Free Public Library, Avon, CT

 ~ Posted by Linda J. 

2019 Washington State Book Awards finalists!

Congratulations to the finalists for the 2019 Washington State book Awards!  The awards, a program of the Washington Center for the Book, honor outstanding books published by Washington authors in 2018.

Finalists in all eight categories will be honored and winners announced at a ceremony and reception on Saturday, Oct. 12, 2019, 7 to 9 p.m. at the Central Library. The event is free and open to all.

Here are the finalists! Continue reading “2019 Washington State Book Awards finalists!”

The Apollo 11 Anniversary 1969-2019

What began as one small step for [a] man, is now one giant leap through half a century of the calendar of human history, as we commemorate the first landing on the moon, July 20, 1969.

With the anniversary comes books and other resources highlighting the landing, the astronauts, and the space race—which was an echo of the Cold War with the Soviet Union. After some early experiments in space, President Kennedy in 1961 set the mission for the nation, to land a person on the moon by the end of the sixties. This story had it all, great characters, drama, heroes and villains, pathos and tragedy, and finally triumph. Also, microwaves, Teflon, and the never ending development of technology that came about as offshoots of the space missions during that half century.

Some of the newer titles out for the anniversary year include the books American Moonshot: John F. Kennedy and the Great Space Race by Douglas Brinkley, Apollo’s Legacy: Perspectives on the Moon Landings by Roger Launius, and One Giant Leap: The Impossible Mission That Flew Us to the Moon by Charles Fishman.

DVDs include First Man (based on the book by James Hansen), and from director Todd Douglas Miller, Apollo 11. Continue reading “The Apollo 11 Anniversary 1969-2019”