The End of Men

Not really! But this plot premise is popping up in recent fiction, usually as a virus that only targets men and leads to their widespread demise as the world collectively panics. Is now the best time to read about rampant viruses? Maybe not. But if you want to distract yourself from our current viral situation with some fictional versions then hey, why not? And it is intriguing to envision.

The End of Men by Christina Sweeney-Baird
In 2025, a lethal virus breaks out in Scotland which only impacts men. As the Great Male Plague spreads around the world, impacts ripple from the personal to the societal.
     Pick this one: to view the action through the perspectives and experiences of a large cast of characters, including a doctor, virologists, a historian on the run with her son, a nanny, plus smaller one-off vignettes from a wide swathe of characters. Continue reading “The End of Men”

#BookBingoNW2021: Mystery and Crime under 250 pages

As Summer Book Bingo 2021 comes down to the wire (deadline: Sept. 7), you may be looking to maximize your remaining reading time. To that end, here are a selection of mysteries that clock in under 250 pages, for rapid reading. Feeling more leisurely? Check out our longer list of suggested mystery/crime novels.

Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2021: Mystery and Crime under 250 pages”

#BookBingoNW2021: Graphic Novel or Comic

This is a short list of my favorite reads that can be applied to the graphic novel or comic 2021 Book Bingo square. These are thrilling, heart wrenching, thoughtful stories.

Infinitum: An Afrofuturist Tale by Tim Fielder
From the distant past through to the unforeseeable future, King Aja Oba lives many lives, made immortal by a curse that seeks to destroy his spirit.. From royal warlord, to soldier, to god, Oba’s fate is tied to that of the universe as he lives through the history of and is witness to the demise of his fellow enslaved Africans and early Black Americans. This uplifting graphic novel contains elements of  historical fiction, sci-fi, fantasy, romance, humor and horror.

Muhammad Ali: Kinshasa 1974 by Jean David Morvan
Part graphic novel, part historical black and white photograph collection, Morvan’s book relives Muhammad Ali’s reclaiming of the world champion boxing title through the eyes of photojournalist Abbas for Young Africa Magazine.

Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2021: Graphic Novel or Comic”

Watch and Read: Stranger Things

While I can honestly watch Stranger Things over and over and over again we have so much material that adds on to the Stranger Things universe to quench your nerdy hearts. As well as a few reads to give you the same feeling the show did – for all ages!

The Stranger Things Field Guild by Nadia Bailey
An ultimate fan read, get to know your favorite characters even more!

Stranger Things by Jody Houser
Want to know more about Will Beyer’s time in the Upside Down? What about the other children who escaped from Hawkins Lab? And how was the door opened to the Upside Down? Continue the series by reading these graphic novels available though Hoopla Comics. 

Meddling Kids by Edgar Cantero
For Andy, Kerri, Nate, and Peter it all started and ended with the Blyton Summer Detective Club in 1977. But turns out their last case wasn’t finished and there is something worse than a man in a mask waiting for them this time. A mash-up of Scooby-Doo meets Stranger Things. Continue reading “Watch and Read: Stranger Things”

Three on a Theme: LGBT Comics

While many of us tend to associate the graphic novel and comic book genre with superheroes, in a cultural market dominated by companies like Marvel and DC that produce blockbuster movies based in on graphic novels every year, there are plenty of other types of comic books out there that are available to you with your library card! Specifically, the library has a great variety of graphic novels by queer authors telling queer stories in a variety of comic genres and suitable for a variety of ages. Here are just three of those to get you started.

My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness by Kabi Nagata
This autobiographical manga, which was published after it gained a cult-following on the Internet as a web comic, tells the story of a twenty-something woman’s struggles with her identity and social interaction. Although the story hinges on the narrator’s first experience of lesbian intimacy with an escort at the age of 28, it really explores the rest of her life in much more detail – such as her struggles with social anxiety, depression, eating disorders, her relationship to her parents (who are constantly disappointed in her), and how all these things coalesced into her finally coming to terms with her identity as a lesbian late in her twenties. While the content is certainly heavy, especially for readers who may have experience with self harm or eating Continue reading “Three on a Theme: LGBT Comics”