#BookBingoNW2018: Written by an author from another country

Sitting in the top right corner, the category Written by an author from another country could be vital to making bingo vertically, horizontally, or the elusive diagonal bingo. We’re here to help you get it filled. For inspiration, you could consult previous posts about intriguing African fictionEast Asian fiction, European fiction, Latin American fiction, or Australian mysteries from the past few years.

Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2018: Written by an author from another country”

#BookBingoNW2018: History — and historical fiction

Still trying to fill that “history” square on your Book Bingo card?  If you are like me, you learn a lot of your history from historical fiction. So the historical details and events that provide such a rich background for these novels had better be accurate!

Following are some of my favorite titles that incorporate meticulously researched history into their compelling stories:

The Blood of Flowers by Anita Amirrezvani
This novel features a grim plot (a young woman faces a series of calamities following her father’s death), but I was won over by the fascinating setting of 17th century Persia, and its flourishing community of carpet-weavers. Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2018: History — and historical fiction”

#BookBingoNW2018: Author (or character) with a disability*

Something special is happening in Seattle July 1 through the 6th: The USA Special Olympic Games! “More than 4,000 athletes and coaches representing 50 state Programs and the District of Columbia, along with the support of tens of thousands of volunteers and spectators, will compete in 14 Olympic-type team and individual sports.” –from Special Olympics USA.

Image of the Special Olympics founder Eunice Kennedy Shriver with the Olympic Stadium in the background
Founder Eunice Kennedy Shriver

It’s also in it’s 50th year! Founded in 1968 by Eunice Kennedy Shriver, the Special Olympics movement has grown to more than 5.7 million athletes and Unified partners in 172 countries. With the support of more than 1 million coaches and volunteers, Special Olympics delivers 32 Olympic-type sports and over 108,000 games and competitions throughout the year.  In the United States, over 700 thousand athletes and Unified partners from 52 state Programs participate in sports offered at the national, regional, state, local and area levels. From Traditional (athletes with intellectual disabilities) to Unified Sports (athletes with and without disabilities competing together), Special Olympics offers activities every day of every year for people to get involved locally to globally. –from Special Olympics USA

In honor of that event Book Bingo this year features a square for a disabled author or disabled character. Here are a few title suggestions to complete that bingo square: Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2018: Author (or character) with a disability*”

Seattle Reads Homegoing: Fiction to Read Next

In 2018 Seattle Reads Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi. Beginning in Ghana, 1760, Homegoing follows the parallel paths of two half-sisters and seven generations of their descendants in Ghana and the United States, in a stunning saga of the African diaspora that illuminates slavery’s troubled legacy. Gyasi will be in Seattle for a series of events May 16-17; find the full schedule here, including book groups, genealogy workshops, and three appearances by Gyasi.

We hope you’ve read, or are planning to read, Homegoing. Perhaps you enjoyed how Gyasi portrayed the sweep of familial generations, or the evocation of families dealing with enslavement and the aftermath. Perhaps you’re wondering – what do I read next? Fret not, our librarians have put together a list of fiction for fans of Homegoing to help you out.

Continue reading “Seattle Reads Homegoing: Fiction to Read Next”

New Fiction Roundup – May 2018

5/1: The Abbot’s Tale by Conn Iggulden – In this gripping historical novel, Iggulden intertwines the story of Dunstan, Abbot of Glastonbury (later Saint Dunstan) with the story of seven tenth-century kings who struggled to unite the disparate Anglo-Saxon kingdoms into one unified England. For fans of Bernard Cornwell. Continue reading “New Fiction Roundup – May 2018”