Bloodsucking Fiends by Christopher Moore

blood_sucking_fiends.jpgWhen Jody becomes a vampire, she realizes that even though being young and beautiful forever is kind of cool, there are a few serious draw backs — like blood thirst, dropping dead at dawn, and the problem of finding suitable employment. So what’s a girl to do when she can’t hold a job, eat a bagel, or buy new shoes? Enter Tommy Flood, a wanna-be-writer working the night shift at the local Safeway. With Tommy’s help Jody can become the creature of the night she was reborn to be. That is if Elijah, her maker, and the Animals, Tommy’s vampire-hunting buddies, don’t kill her first. Bloodsucking Fiends is by turns goofy and quick witted, a combination that will make you laugh out loud in public places. If that’s not your thing, you might want to skip it and its sequel, titled You Suck.

yousuck.jpgYou Suck: A Love Story by Christopher Moore

As far as Tommy Flood’s concerned, being a vampire isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. There’s the blood drinking, the sunburns, and the teenage goth-girl who wants to be his ‘minion.’ As if that wasn’t bad enough, he and his girlfriend (also undead) are being hunted by a centuries old vampire as well as a group of vampire-hunter-wannabes who know exactly how Tommy thinks. After all, he used to be their leader. It’s a race for survival, and a comedy of errors that will make you laugh until your funny bone hurts. 

Gaiman gives it away!

American GodsAnd we like it. To celebrate the seventh birthday of his blog, the wildly inventive Neil Gaiman asked his fans to vote on which of his titles they’d like a free electronic copy of. Now that the voting is over, American Gods is available for online readers at the Harpercollins site for the month of March. Gaiman’s fourth novel tells of an epic struggle between a pantheon of dieties such as Odin, Anansi and Thoth, long thought dead but actually just lying low and doing menial jobs, and an upstart race of New American Gods – gods of television and the credit card, the Internet and the internal combustion engine.

Gaiman is not the first hugely talented author of speculative fiction to offer their work gratis. Kelly Link, Charles Stross, and Cory Doctorow are among a growing group of forward-thinking writers giving away their work via creative commons licensing. And there are other visionary organizations that have been giving books away for over a century! As Gaiman put it in a recent post on his blog: “Libraries are good things: you shouldn’t have to pay for every book you read.” Amen.

The Other Boleyn Girl

boleyngirl1.jpgI’m a sucker for Tudor tales, so you can bet I’m excited that Philippa Gregory’s wonderful novel, The Other Boleyn Girl, is coming to the big screen this coming weekend (opens on February 29). I’ve certainly read a lot about Anne Boleyn over the years, but Mary Boleyn? This piece of historical fiction was new to me. And, oh, what scandal and intrigue ensue when Anne and Mary (and their brother, George) arrive at King Henry VIII’s court! Was Mary, who was already married to one of Henry’s courtiers, really the favored sister? What scheming took place to make sure that the Howard family rose to power above the Seymours? The book is a fast-paced almost racy read, and certainly worth reading before you see the movie (starring Natalie Portman and Scarlett Johansson; my excitement knows no bounds!).

What to read next, to keep the Tudor fires burning? There’s certainly no shortage in historical fiction for this slice of history, but if you liked The Other Boleyn Girl, try these two by the same author: The Constant Princess (follows the life of Katherine of Aragon, the first wife of Henry VIII) and The Boleyn Inheritance (lady-in-waiting Jane Boleyn testifies against Anne of Cleves, while her family works to place Katherine Howard on the throne). Or perhaps you, like me, have a bit of a Lady Jane Grey obsession going that started way back in elementary school? Then you won’t want to miss Innocent Traitor, the first novel by respected biographer Alison Weir. It’s a bit meatier than The Other Boleyn Girl, but just as engrossing.

Let’s hear about some other Tudor novels you’ve read …

Modern Scotland: A unique view of a people

chryscamposkilt.jpgBeing of Scottish descent on my mother’s side of the family (the Crawford Clan), I eagerly await and devour each fictional window of modern Scotland from Alexander McCall-Smith. Although best known for his delightful tales (beginning with the No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency) set in Botswana, he also brings today’s Scottish folks alive in two series set in Edinburgh: the light mysteries featuring Isabel Dalhousie, an ethics philosopher, and the crazy quilt of characters living in or otherwise connected to the 44 Scotland Street apartment building.

Beyond being a wise and hilarious writer, McCall-Smith is a voice in the wilderness as he muses about the socially dark side of consumerism, celebrity worship and the global economy. For me, and for many, I think, it’s impossible to make it through one of his books without shedding a few tears and laughing out loud. Treat yourself!

Craig

An old master dies

winterpeople.jpgThe dowager queen of suspense, prolific author Phyllis Whitney died earlier this month (February 8, 2008) from pneumonia. She was 104 years old. In 80 years she wrote more than 100 short stories and 70 novels in four genres — adult, children’s mystery, young adult and nonfiction guides to writing. She published her last book when she was 94. She also received many prestigious awards, served as president of Mystery Writers of America (MWA) and in 1988 earned MWA’s Grand Master Award, a lifetime achievement award for mystery writers.

Whitney said she stayed young by writing fast-paced, cliff-hanger tales of suspense. Maybe in high school you read The Winter People, and swooned in terror with Dina, or maybe years later you discovered Amethyst Dreams, a riveting tale of Hallie’s frantic search for her closest friend Susan.

According to her Website, Whitney did exhaustive research for her novels, always writing from the viewpoint of an American visiting the country for the first time. She ascribed her success to persistence and an abiding faith in her abilities. “Never mind the rejections, the discouragement, the voices of ridicule (there can be those too),” she wrote in Guide to Fiction Writing. “Work and wait and learn, and that train will come by. If you give up, you’ll never have a chance to climb aboard.”

Let’s honor the mystery queen, climb her train and rediscover her voluminous work.

~ Susan