Science Fiction for the Movie Based Fan!

I love science fiction – but realized recently that the genre is really different to read than it is to watch. I have two dozen favorite TV shows and movies that are all science fiction, but really struggle to find the same styles and pacing in books. However, I have recently come across some titles that will make many movie fans happy.

Record of A Spaceborn Few

I love a good close knit crew doing something difficult and seeing chosen families in space is always awesome. That’s why I loved Becky Chambers most recent installment Record of A Space Born Few, a sequel to The Long Way to A Small Angry Planet and A Close and Common Orbit, which takes us to the space born traditions of the descendants of earths survivors. Even as times change and folks move planet-side there is an aspect of losing culture that is rarely talked about in science fiction. Chambers writing has the right amount of detail while keeping the story moving forward. Continue reading “Science Fiction for the Movie Based Fan!”

Holiday Shopping Guide from Reader Services

Happy Holidays! Here are some of our 2019 favorites for the readers on your shopping list this year:

Edge of Your SeatAmerican Spy
The Last Woman in the Forest by Diane Les Becquets
The Last House Guest by Megan Miranda
American Spy by Lauren Wilkinson
Freefall by Jessica Barry
No Exit by Taylor Adams

Dysfunctional Families
The Cassandra by Sharma Shields
The Dutch House by Ann Patchett
The Grammarians by Cathleen Schine
Mostly Dead Things by Kristen N. Arnett
The Lost Man by Jane Harper

Unreliable Narrator The Need
The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides
They All Fall Down by Rachel Howzell Hall
Five Windows by Jon Roemer
Speaking of Summer by Kalisha Buckhanon
The Need by Helen Phillips Continue reading “Holiday Shopping Guide from Reader Services”

New fiction roundup, November 2019

No matter what you read – romance, fantasy, historical fiction, prize-winning fiction – November has a new release for you.

11/5: The Book of Lost Saints by Daniel José Older – In this multigenerational Cuban-American family story of revolution, loss, and family bonds, the spirit of a woman who disappeared during the Cuban Revolution visits her nephew to spur him into unearthing their family history.

11/5: The Deep by Rivers Solomon – The water-breathing descendants of African slave women tossed overboard have built their own underwater society, and must reclaim the memories of their past to shape their future.

11/5: Get a Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert – In this romantic comedy Chloe Brown – a chronically ill computer geek with a goal, a plan, and a list – recruits her mysterious, sexy neighbor to help her get a life.

11/5: Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo – The intersections of identity among an interconnected group of Black British women are portrayed in this 2019 Winner of the Booker Prize. A Peak Pick!

11/5: The Revisioners by Margaret Wilkerson Sexton – An elegant and historically inspired story of survivors and healers, of black women and their black sons, of female friendship, set in the American South. Continue reading “New fiction roundup, November 2019”

Top 10 Noteworthy 2019 Speculative Fiction Books Part 2

A continuation of our favorite speculative fiction works this year! So far…

The Future of Another Timeline by Annalee Newitz. Annalee Newitz just won a Hugo Award for the Our Opinions Are Correct podcast with their partner Charlie Jane Anders and is a writer of both science and science fiction. TFOAT is a fiercely feminist queer punk rock time travel novel that follows Tess, a time traveling geologist and her cohort of time travelers who are orchestrating a fine-tuned fight against a group of men hell-bent on stopping women’s rights from ever advancing. It’s the kind of science fiction that reminds us about how the future is happening right now and it’s up to us to collectively work towards better futures. Continue reading “Top 10 Noteworthy 2019 Speculative Fiction Books Part 2”

Top 10 Noteworthy 2019 Speculative Fiction Books Part 1

Even though it’s only October and there are still two more months left for publishing and reading in 2019 we are already assembling our “best lists”.

Here are some of our favorite speculative fiction works this year (so far):

The City in the Middle of the Night by Charlie Jane Anders. This is a science fiction novel steeped in the politics and prose of relationships. Humanity has arrived on a cold, tidally-locked planet, January, with searing sun rays on one side and constructed societies of survival in different pockets on the dark side of the planet with different rules and regulations. Sophie and Bianca, and the itinerant Mouth narrate the novel. Sophie is spellbound by Bianca, a beautiful girl from the ruling class with bold ideas about how to change the society they are in, intoxicating with out-sized personality and revolutionary dreams. This is a story of ecological consequences, humanity’s push and pull for control and freedom, our need to have someone to believe in, how our idea of the person we love may be quite different from the person they truly are, and how it is so hard to admit when we have been betrayed by a person we thought worthy of our trust. Continue reading “Top 10 Noteworthy 2019 Speculative Fiction Books Part 1”