New and Notable Northwest Nonfiction – 2019 edition

Are you new to the Northwest, or a lifelong resident looking for some historical perspective? 2019 is shaping up to be an exciting year for publishing about our region, so let the reading begin!

The University of Washington Press is releasing a number of regionally relevant titles. Explore local fashion with Seattle Style by Clara Berg, which features garments and accessories from the collection at the Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI). In Transit, Jim Kershner looks back at 125+ years of trolleys, trains and buses that have served the region. Sculpture on a Grand Scale by Tyler Sprague explores the work of Jack Christiansen, whose design of the Kingdome combined thin shell concrete with a modern aesthetic. Continue reading “New and Notable Northwest Nonfiction – 2019 edition”

The World is Your Oyster

Growing up in the Pacific Northwest the winter season wasn’t something that stopped us from doing what we enjoyed as a family. Sure cuddling by the fireplace and reading books was one way to enjoy it since we are a family of readers, but this is also the season of crabbing, clam digging, grilling oysters, and taking advantage of non-peak camping rates!

Here are a few items in our collection to get you started on your Winter adventures:

Continue reading “The World is Your Oyster”

New Digital Collection Highlights Lives of Seattle Pioneers

This month we’ve launched a new digital collection which reveals a glimpse into the personal lives of some of Seattle’s early pioneers. The Lu Jacobson Collection of Latimer and Denny Family Material includes materials focusing on Alexander Latimer, his wife Sarah Chesney Latimer and their five daughters: Narcissa Latimer Denny, Eliza Alice Latimer Fowler, Harriet Ellen Latimer Stephens, Clara Latimer Bickford, and Emma Chesney Latimer Reynolds.

Narcissa, Alice, Hattie, Clara, and Emma Latimer, circa 1880.

The descendants of the Latimer family played a significant role in the founding of Seattle. Alexander Latimer’s sister, Sarah Latimer, married her first husband, Richard Boren in 1822. Their children, Mary Ann Boren Denny, Carson Dobbins Boren and Louisa Boren, were in the group of Seattle’s first settlers who landed at Alki on November 13, 1851. They were accompanied by Arthur Armstrong Denny (husband to Mary Ann Boren Denny) and David Thomas Denny (soon to be husband to Louisa Boren). Arthur and David were the sons Sarah Latimer’s second husband John Denny from a previous marriage. Continue reading “New Digital Collection Highlights Lives of Seattle Pioneers”

Books for Two

Our book group is growing! We reached out to a few friends to start building that sense of community around books so from now on we’ll be Books for Two or More! It’s still a no pressure book group and size doesn’t matter -we’ll be getting together once every two months to discuss our read.

Here were our Books for Two selections for October through December:

Amaro: The Spirited World of Bittersweet, Herbal Liqueurs with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas by Brad Thomas Parsons

This book is a gem, we learned so much in just a few pages. I’ve had two encounters with Amari over the years: Amaro Nonino Quintessentia and Fernet-Branca. Amaro Nonino was an amazing experience…Fernet-Branca, not so much, at least for me, my husband loooooves it. My friend’s husband is from Argentina and drinks it with Coca-Cola…you’ll read about that in this book…and that’s how my husband got hooked. I’m excited to try other Amari and other Fernets; its a big wide world out there! And the recipes to make cocktails and even your own Amaro at home was wonderful!

Educated by Tara Westover

This book was remarkable; the author pulls you into her life. Born in Idaho to a survivalist Mormon family, her father is the head of the home and makes that known at every turn. Paranoid of the government and the medical establishment the children receive a “home-schooled education” and are expected to work for their father at a very young age. While Tara would sometimes help her mother, an herbalist and midwife, with oils and tinctures, she was also called out to the junkyard to help her father gather scrap. The work in the junkyard is the cause of multiple injuries to family members over the years with tonics and salves given by their mother that are shockingly inadequate. Tara also suffers at the hand of an abusive brother…but everything is the Lord’s way. As Tara looks to a life outside of her small world she seeks an education that, while makes her more complete, pulls her farther and farther away from family and home.

The Heart by Maylis de Kerangal

Taking place within twenty-four hours, this book follows the beginning, middle, and end of the path of a donated heart. Three young men make their way to the beach, the waves calling their names, on their way home exhausted the driver falls asleep at the wheel. One doesn’t make it, his brain ceases to function, but his organs can still go on. The layers this book takes from the parents, to the surgeon, to the interns, and finally to the recipient was a tragic and beautiful journey of hope.

You can look back on previous Books for Two by following our blog posts here: Books for Two

Our book selection for January and February is An Anonymous Girl by Greer Hendricks – A Peak Pick!

~posted by Kara P.