Ten Non-Fiction Books We Loved in 2018

As the New Year approaches, join our librarians in looking back on our favorite reading of the year gone by. By popular acclaim, here are ten non-fiction titles that made the biggest impact on us in 2018. (Fiction and books for youth will follow in the days to come).

2018 was a huge year for books about society and politics, and while journalistic potboilers focused on the executive branch may have garnered all the hype, we think that long after most of these are forgotten, Jill Lepore’s magisterial and insightful These Truths: A History of the United States is likely to be stimulating and provoking conversation among readers. Likewise, Mona Hanna-Attisha’s gripping first-hand account of the Flint water crisis, What the Eyes Don’t See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City, provides a powerful and inspiring account of the confluence of environmental and racial issues in America today. Continue reading “Ten Non-Fiction Books We Loved in 2018”

New Nonfiction Roundup – December 2018

December’s not just about the holidays. Enjoy these nonfiction titles being released this month.

12/4: Babel. Gaston Dorren explores the twenty most widely spoken languages in the world, which accounts for half of the Earth’s population.

12/4: Congo Stories. Fidel Bafilemba and John Prendergast consider the impact of five decades of exploitation of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Continue reading “New Nonfiction Roundup – December 2018”

New Fiction Roundup – December 2018

12/4: The Accidental Beauty Queen by Teri Wilson – School librarian Charlotte finds herself filling in for her glamorous twin sister who falls ill the night before a beauty pageant.

12/4: The Dakota Winters by Tom Barbash – This family saga follows the Winters family, living New York City’s famed Dakota building, in the year leading up to John Lennon’s assassination.

12/4: Eighteen Below by Stefan Ahnhem – When a police chase in Helsingborg ends in the death of a tech entrepreneur, Danish police officer Fabian Risk makes a bizarre discovery that complicates the case. Continue reading “New Fiction Roundup – December 2018”

Bus Reads for November

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in November:

There Therebook cover image of There There by Tommy Orange. It was one of those books I loved, but wanted more. I want more book, I want a sequel, I want more of the story, more, more, more, but it was beautiful and tragic and a needed voice. This story centers around the Oakland powwow that takes place at the end of the novel, those who are a part of it, those who want to be a part of it, and those that bring in harm. You have multiple character perspectives and as you read you start to see the connections being made. This book had brilliance and poetry in its commentary on the lives of urban Indians. The author also brings in history and stereotype and blows everything wide open. Continue reading “Bus Reads for November”

Cultivating Gratitude with Picture Books

“What I have come to believe is that joy is the twin sister of gratitude.  I am most joyful when I am most grateful.”*
         –Katherine Paterson, Newbery Medal-winning author

Thankfulness doesn’t end with Thanksgiving. Enjoy these wonderful picture books celebrating gratitude!

Gracias, Thanks by Pat Mora, illustrated by John Parra
A boy recounts the many things he is thankful for, in both Spanish and English.  This Pura Belpré Honor winner brims with a sense of happiness brought by the small pleasures in life. Continue reading “Cultivating Gratitude with Picture Books”