A Lifetime of Reading Finally Pays Off!

Sure, reading has been shown to improve empathy in adults and emotional intelligence in children. Plus it’s affordable and enjoyable, and you feel, learn and experience so much. But what about making you the envy of your friends? Has reading ever bought the next round of beer? Where are the fabulous prizes?

That’s all about to change!

Introducing the Bookish Trivia Trilogy, a trio of literary trivia nights hosted in local bars this coming October 2, 8 and 16th as part of Booktobefest 2018. For the past three years, trivia buffs and newbies alike have flocked to our fun free pub trivia nights each October. This year, acceding to popular demand, we’re tilting the field in favor of the people who keep us in business: readers!  Continue reading “A Lifetime of Reading Finally Pays Off!”

Seattle Writes offers free writing classes this fall

Strengthen your fiction, improve your nonfiction, experiment with poetry — we have more than 25 free writing classes lined up for writers this fall  through the Seattle Writes series. You’ll also find drop-in writing circles (no pressure! really!), write-ins scheduled during November for National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo), and special presentations on writing and publishing for children and teens. Here’s a taste of what our fall 2018 Seattle Writes faculty is offering:

Anastacia-Reneé on resistance
Laura Da’ on poetry of place
Karen Finneyfrock on emotion in fiction
Reagan Jackson on memoir
Brian McDonald on story structure
Susan Meyers on starting your novel
Peter Mountford on making a scene
Nancy Rawles on writing silence
Beth Slattery on writing for procrastinators
Jolie Stekly on children’s publishing
Anca Szilagyi on contemporary fairy tales
Ann Teplick on teen poetry (for teen writers only)
Kristen Millares Young on better storytelling through research Continue reading “Seattle Writes offers free writing classes this fall”

Thrilling Tales is Off to the Races!

This summer, Thrilling Tales (the Library’s Story Time for Grown Ups) takes listeners off to the races with a pair of horse racing tales,  and then out into the rose garden with Shirley Jackson to dig into dark underside suburbia, before heading to the seashore to grapple with aliens from another world, and from the briny deep! Come join us this August and September for live readings suspenseful and strange, either at noon (bring along some lunch), or at 7 p.m. with Thrilling Tales After Dark! All story times are under an hour, and are absolutely free. Here’s what’s coming up: Continue reading “Thrilling Tales is Off to the Races!”

Don’t be afraid of the dark: Thrilling Tales just for you!

For several years now, audiences have been flocking to our twice monthly lunch hour program Thrilling Tales: A Storytime for Grownups, and every so often someone tells us they wish there were an evening version of these readings. Well, it’s finally happening!

Staring on June 18, we’ll be sharing some of our favorite suspenseful tales in monthly readings at the Central Library. We’re calling it Thrilling Tales After Dark. Written by a variety of master storytellers such as Ray Bradbury, Shirley Jackson and Truman Capote, the stories range from wondrous to eerie to truly terrifying, and are drawn from the early years of Thrilling Tales. All readings run from 7-8 p.m., at the Central Library’s Microsoft Auditorium, finishing in just under an hour, and they are free. Take a look at what’s coming up:

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Continue reading “Don’t be afraid of the dark: Thrilling Tales just for you!”

Seattle Reads Homegoing: Fiction to Read Next

In 2018 Seattle Reads Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi. Beginning in Ghana, 1760, Homegoing follows the parallel paths of two half-sisters and seven generations of their descendants in Ghana and the United States, in a stunning saga of the African diaspora that illuminates slavery’s troubled legacy. Gyasi will be in Seattle for a series of events May 16-17; find the full schedule here, including book groups, genealogy workshops, and three appearances by Gyasi.

We hope you’ve read, or are planning to read, Homegoing. Perhaps you enjoyed how Gyasi portrayed the sweep of familial generations, or the evocation of families dealing with enslavement and the aftermath. Perhaps you’re wondering – what do I read next? Fret not, our librarians have put together a list of fiction for fans of Homegoing to help you out.

Continue reading “Seattle Reads Homegoing: Fiction to Read Next”