Conversation Hearts: An Inclusive Love Fest for Romance Readers and Writers

Romance readers and writers are passionate people. They are passionate about the power of love to transform people’s lives and to transform the world. They are passionate about an HEA (Happily-Ever-After) or a HFN (Happy-for-Now). And it’s safe to say they are tired of hearing ill-informed and dismissive opinions about the genre they love. If you haven’t read a romance or attended a romance event, now is the time!

Romance readers and writers are also asking for more inclusive and representative writers and characters. An article in the Guardian last year, Fifty shades of white: the long fight against racism in romance novels, highlighted the need for diverse voices in the field and much work needs to be done in publishing and the greater reading and writing community to create change. Continue reading “Conversation Hearts: An Inclusive Love Fest for Romance Readers and Writers”

Upcoming Author Events

Andre Acimen, David Treuer, Clifford Thompson, Julie Pham, cartoonist T Edward Bak, and a love fest for romance readers are among the featured author events coming your way.

The free programs listed below are held at a variety of locations in November (Central Library, Montlake Branch Library, Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute); please check our online Author and Books Events calendar for complete details on these featured November events and more.

André Aciman with Dave Wheeler
Find Me
Monday, November 4, 7 p.m.
Central Library, Microsoft Auditorium
Join us to hear novelist André Aciman, the author of the worldwide bestseller Call Me by Your Name, discuss his new book, which revisits the complex and beguiling characters from Call Me by Your Name decades after their first meeting. He will appear in conversation with Dave Wheeler of Shelf Awareness.

The A. Scott Bullitt Lecture in American History presents David Treuer
“The Past Isn’t Past: Native History as American History”
Thursday, November 7, at 7 p.m.
Central Library
Anthropologist David Treuer, author of The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present (finalist for the 2019 National Book Award), struggled with popular depictions of Native American history (including the bestselling Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee), many of which seemed to conclude that his culture was a relic of the past. Treuer has spent his career dissecting narratives around Native American life and will talk about what he’s learned. Josh Reid, professor at the University of Washington, will join Treuer on stage. Continue reading “Upcoming Author Events”

The Space Needle: A 21st Century View

How many times have you gauged your location or some necessary distance by that 605 foot spinning top of a landmark? Long after March 1962, the centerpiece of Seattle Center has evolved just as the campus it towers over continues to morph and change with the ever-growing city surrounding it.

The future is here! Built in record time, the Space Needle went from being a doodle of an idea, on a napkin, to an iconic landmark. Once the largest structure west of the Mississippi, the Space Needle is now dwarfed by buildings that soar over the 605 foot tower. Continue reading “The Space Needle: A 21st Century View”

If only my library were in a bar… Booktoberfest 2019!

Think of it: the nerdy erudition of your neighborhood library, crossed with the convivial bonhomie of your local pub. That’s Booktoberfest, now in its fifth year! Trivia, karaoke, happy hours, all with a bookish twist. Storytimes, art class, and literary readings, all in bars! Come out and celebrate the season with us. Here’s what’s in store: Continue reading “If only my library were in a bar… Booktoberfest 2019!”

Ale Yeah!

My dad’s favorite beer was Schmidt – during football games or working in the garage, that was his go-to drink of choice. Occasionally he might add some tomato juice, but more often than not it was just that simple can with a fish on the label. Camping in my twenties I often grabbed a pack of Rolling Rock or Corona, but I don’t think I started to appreciate beer until I met my husband. Born in Michigan, he was exposed to more floral notes of the hop rather than bitter. I didn’t like IPAs at all until he had me try Bell’s Two Hearted…a smile came to my face when I saw it too had a fish on the label. Not sure dad would have cared for it, but it taught me to discover I had a palate. Now drinking beer is all about trying and discovering. My local favorites are Dystopian’s Coconut Cream Ale and Georgetown’s Gusto Crema. Outside of state lines I’ve fallen for Founder’s Green Zebra as my go to gose; for a stout, Perennial nails it with their Abraxas; for a shandy, Short’s does it for me with their Soft Parade, and Riverbend kills it with their Milkshake IPAs…Hawaiian Crunch is calling my name right now! And now I know no matter where I go, I’ll find something I enjoy.

For those that can’t hit the road right now for a beer tour here are a few books to get some studying in before your beer imbibing adventure begins!

Tasting Cider: The Cidercraft Guide to Distinctive Flavors of North American Hard Cider by Erin James Continue reading “Ale Yeah!”