Learning From Home

Homeschool is the new school for Washington through the rest of the 2019-2020 year. Teachers are finding ways to connect with parents and classes, providing online and printed resources as best they can to keep pace with their students’ need for knowledge. Families can also find valuable resources through the library to supplement their home classroom learning for all ages.

The Everything Kids Joke BookStudying at home is tough. Focusing in an environment that we associate with play can take some getting used to. You can make the transition easier with some brain teasing puzzles and word games from Michael Dahl’s The Everything Kid’s Joke Book, recommended for kids 7-12. Break up lesson time with laugh breaks! Make reading its own reward with silly puns! Build vocabulary with story jokes. While you can’t print from Overdrive materials, kids can copy crosswords and “picto-laughs” to finish. Fun in the classroom can maximize motivation, especially when the classroom is at home. Continue reading “Learning From Home”

Communicating with Kids Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing about COVID-19

Finding the right words and communicating with children about COVID-19 may be difficult right now. Not all the resources out there meet the needs of all children. So, below are some resources that may help with communicating with deaf and hard of hearing children.

The Washington State Department of Health has created an eight-part American Sign Language video series explaining the various aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic. These videos touch on topics like What is COVID-19, How is COVID-19 Spread, Prevention and Treatment, and more.

video still from ASL COVID-19 Video Series - Introduction

Continue reading “Communicating with Kids Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing about COVID-19”

Nightstand Reads: Seattle author Sharon H. Chang shares from her bookpile(s)

Our guest blogger today is Sharon H. Chang, author of Raising Mixed Race: Multiracial Asian Children in a Post-Racial World. Sharon H. Chang is a writer, scholar and activist who focuses on racism, social justice and the Asian American diaspora with a feminist lens. She serves as a consultant for Families of Color Seattle and is on the planning committee for the Critical Mixed Race Studies Conference. Join us for her book talk, along with local mixed-race guest speakers and performers, on Thursday, September 29 at 7 p.m. at the Central Library.

Dear Readers,raising-mixed-race

First. Truth. I’ve got books on my nightstand but I don’t read at night. I mostly read in the early, early morning before the sun comes up; when the air outside is quiet, still and fresh; when cars are parked, the hustle bustle of the day hasn’t begun and most people are still sound asleep; most importantly my six-year-old son is still sound asleep. And I keep books all over the house. On my nightstand yes. But also on shelves, counters, in book bags, unopened and opened boxes, upstairs and downstairs, half-read, read twice, never read, will read later, reading now. In my head I have a rule “one book at a time, finish first then the next.” But in reality that never works out. There is – to simply put the simple truth – just too much exciting stuff to read and not always the perfect time to read it in.

So what’s in my for-the-morning nightstand/all-over-the-house piles right now? Continue reading “Nightstand Reads: Seattle author Sharon H. Chang shares from her bookpile(s)”

Girls on the Run

Last year I took part in a program called Girls on the Run. I volunteered to be a Running Buddy for Highland Park Elementary School, located a block from where I grew up. As a Running Buddy you get partnered with a girl to run a practice 5K, then run the Girls on the Run 5K along with numerous schools throughout Seattle, held at Magnuson Park. The energy and girl empowerment was a magnificent sight to see! The whole time I was enveloped into this world I thought: I wish I had this growing up. Continue reading “Girls on the Run”

Tricky books

An amazingly wide range of questions come across our library information desks, I’m sure every librarian has their favorites. My current favorite was from an earnest young man of around seven years of age who was interested in “tricky books.” I tried to show him magic books with no satisfaction. Of course there just isn’t a clear way to find those books full of sneaky tricks that little boys need to play on their friends and families…..or is there?

While I wasn’t able to find anything right away to help my young patron (much to his mother’s relief), later after poking around, I started finding some terrific books, targeted right at the adventuresome young man (or woman) in your life: Continue reading “Tricky books”