December Question of the Month: An irregular series

bnr_askaquestion.gifThe reference librarians at Seattle Public Library are pretty darn amazing. They don’t know everything, instead they know where to find everything. As part of an irregular series of posts we salute the talented and dedicated reference staff at your local library. Names and other identifying information have been removed from the questions we showcase. Got a stumper? Click on Ask a Librarian. It’s what we do.

“…In high school, I played in a chamber orchestra… I remember we played a very beautiful piece by Samuel Barber. It was written for string quartet and orchestra, like a string quartet concerto. At least I think it was Barber… I want to find this piece again, but I can’t figure out what it was called?? It was 16 years ago…”

From your description, I believe that it is the Adagio for Strings by Samuel Barber. I looked at the list of Barber’s works and this seems to be the best match for the criteria you gave. This piece was originally written as a movement in Barber’s String Quartet, opus 11, and was arranged for orchestra. It is very popular, very sad and a very beautiful classical piece.  It was played at the funerals of President Franklin Roosevelt and Prince Rainier of Monaco and was also performed at a memorial service for the victims of the September 11th attacks. You can read about the history of the piece in an excellent article on Classical.net by clicking  on this link, Adagio for Strings, Op 11  Since this piece is so popular, you can also watch a YouTube video of the BBC orchestra playing the Adagio at the September 15 2001memorial concert or listen to a recording at Last.fm.
I also have requested both the orchestral version and the quartet version in compact disc for you to pick up at the Library.  The printed music is available in a miniature score string quartet version, and two performing editions, one for piano and one for organ, in case you are interested in revisiting the piece for yourself.

November Question of the Month: An irregular series

The reference librarians at Seattle Public Library are pretty darn amazing.  They don’t know everything, instead they know where to findeverything.  As part of an irregular series of posts we salute the talented and dedicated reference staff at your local library. Names and other identifying information have been removed from the questions we showcase. Got a stumper?
Click on Ask a Librarian. It’s what we do.
 

“When can the new president move into the White House? Any info about the transition would be useful, but the date is crucial.”

The White House staff begin the moving out/moving in process shortly before noon on Inauguration Day.   White House Staff Ready for Presidential Moving Day is a great article from CNN about the transition process featuring extended quotes from Gary Walters, the Chief Usher of the White House.

According to the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Inauguration Day 2009 will be Tuesday, January 20.

October Question of the Month: An irregular series

bnr_askaquestion.gifThe reference librarians at Seattle Public Library are pretty darn amazing. They don’t know everything, instead they know where to find everything. As part of an irregular series of posts we salute the talented and dedicated reference staff at your local library. Names and other identifying information have been removed from the questions we showcase. Got a stumper? Click on Ask a Librarian. It’s what we do.

“What do the numbers on the bottom of the copyright page mean?”

A Google search for “numbers on the copyright page” (in quotes) led to a variety of sources including a blog called “Ask Dave Taylor” where the blog author answered this type of question by calling 2 friends in the publishing industry and a Q&A page from Continue reading “October Question of the Month: An irregular series”

September Question of the Month: An irregular series

The reference librarians at Seattle Public Library are pretty darn amazing. They don’t know everything, instead they know where to find everything. As part of an irregular series of posts we salute the talented and dedicated reference staff at your local library. Names and other identifying information have been removed from the questions we showcase. Got a stumper? Click on Ask a Librarian. It’s what we do. 

I’d like to know what the difference between a Castle and a Palace is? Plus, their historical context…which came first, where, etc, that sorta thing.

We have found the following resources that should help to answer your question:

1. From the Encylcopedia Britannica:

The terms castle and palace have often been used interchangeably, but originally they had different purposes. Castles were fortifications, while palaces have been built for centuries solely as residences for kings and nobles. Historically the Continue reading “September Question of the Month: An irregular series”

August Question of the Month: An irregular series

 The reference librarians at Seattle Public Library are pretty darn amazing. They don’t know everything, instead they know where to find everything. As part of an irregular series of posts we salute the talented and dedicated reference staff at your local library. Names and other identifying information have been removed from the questions we showcase. Got a stumper? Click on Ask a Librarian. It’s what we do.

 I’ve always heard that Seattle had a four-chicken per household rule (and no roosters), according to local law. Can you find out if that is the actual law or ordinance?

Thank you for your question about chickens-per-household regulations in Seattle.  I’ve consulted the online Seattle Municipal Code and have found the following:

C. Domestic Fowl. Up to three (3) domestic fowl may be kept on any lot in addition to the small animals permitted in subsection A. For each one thousand (1,000) square feet of lot area in excess of the minimum lot area required for the zone or, if there is no minimum lot area, for each one thousand (1,000) square feet of lot area in excess of five thousand (5,000) square feet, one (1) additional domestic fowl may be kept. From Seattle Municipal Code: Under: SMC 23.42.052 Keeping of Animals.

(The above referenced Subsection A):

A. Small Animals. Up to three (3) small animals may be kept accessory to each business establishment or dwelling unit on a lot, except as follows: 1. In no case is more than one (1) miniature potbelly pig allowed per business establishment or dwelling unit (see subsection B of this section)…

You can click here for the full text of this section of the Code.

I found no reference to prohibitions on roosters.

If you’d like to clarify the above, you can contact:

Office of the City Clerk
600 4th Avenue, Floor 3
PO Box 94728
Seattle, Washington 98124-4728
Phone: 206-684-8344

I hope this helps. Please let us know if we can provide additional information by replying to this email or by calling 206-386-4636.