New Nonfiction Roundup – March 2019

March is abundant with essays from remarkable women, memoirs from queer celebrities,  true crime tales, and trenchant observations on the black experience.

26 MarathonsFour time Olympian Meb Keflezighi offers wisdom on life, faith, family and running. Continue reading “New Nonfiction Roundup – March 2019”

New Fiction Roundup – March 2019

March sees several new books by Seattle writers, the newest from a former Seattle Reads author, masterful debuts, and the latest from some blockbuster literary fiction authors.

3/5: Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid – A novel about the whirlwind rise of an iconic 1970s rock group, their mesmerizing lead singer, and the mystery behind their infamous breakup. Continue reading “New Fiction Roundup – March 2019”

Read along: Iditarod 2019

This Saturday, March 2 the 47th Iditarod will begin. 52 mushers and their sled dog teams will run 1000 miles of rough terrain from Anchorage to Nome, Alaska, contending with mountains, frozen rivers, sub-zero temperatures, and sleep deprivation. The route roughly follows historic mail routes from the early 20th century, when gold came out and mail and supplies went in via dog sled, and which in 1925 was crucial to supplying diphtheria antitoxin to Nome. If you enjoy following extreme or endurance sports, love working dogs, or just want to know more about the event history and types of people who run this race, check out these items.

Book cover image for The Cruelest MilesThe Cruelest Miles by Gay Salisbury
This is the full story of the serum run that gives the Iditarod its legendary route. In the winter of 1925, Nome was isolated and on the cusp of a deadly diphtheria outbreak, with a desperate need for antitoxin. Airplanes still couldn’t consistently handle cold temperatures, and nothing else could make it through. So the serum was taken by rail from Seattle as far as it could go, and then dog mushers transported it the final 650 miles over 5 days. If you’ve only ever heard of one sled dog, it’s likely Balto, the lead dog of the last team. Continue reading “Read along: Iditarod 2019”

Bus Reads for February

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time.

Here’s what I read on the bus in February:

Book cover image for BrassBrass by Xhenet Aliu. A story of a mother and a daughter and how one’s path sometimes winds it’s way differently than expected. Chapters were told in alternating voices of the mother and the daughter. I loved that you could see the mom’s path unfolding to bring her daughter in the world and the daughter attempting to discover her father and who she is. It was a beautifully told story, one I couldn’t put down. Very much a story of the “American Dream”.

Book cover image for The Other EinsteinThe Other Einstein by Marie Benedict. A fiction book that enlightened me to a real person I knew nothing about…I honestly didn’t even know Einstein was married once, let alone twice. And while it’s fiction based, you really have to wonder if Einstein’s success was rooted in his relationship with his first wife, Mileva Maric. A brilliant mind herself, she gave up so much for her relationship with Einstein. Einstein was also someone I knew little about, but from this read I now consider him a completely selfish person. Too often throughout history men have taken credit for a woman’s work—and I can see how this may be a repeat of that very case.

What are you reading on your commute? Tag your reads on social media #splbusreads.

~posted by Kara P.

Library Reads for March 2019

Here’s a list of 12 novels releasing in March that librarians across the United States are recommending. And because librarians made this list, you’ll also find a “read-alike” entry at the end of each description. Why a read-alike? They work two ways: If you recognize the suggested read-alike title as one you enjoyed before, it lets you know that this new title is one you might like, too. The other way read-alikes are helpful is that they tend to be older and more widely available titles. If there’s a long wait list for the featured title, and it sounds like the perfect book for you, the suggested read-alike may be something you’d also like — and can get quickly. You’ll notice that in the descriptions for the new 2019 books that librarians often add a line along the same lines, such as “if you liked Gillian Flynn, try this one.” In a nutshell, this monthly list has solid recommendations, with insightful guidance for a variety of reading tastes.

Continue reading “Library Reads for March 2019”