#BookBingoNW2018: Written by an author from another country

Sitting in the top right corner, the category Written by an author from another country could be vital to making bingo vertically, horizontally, or the elusive diagonal bingo. We’re here to help you get it filled. For inspiration, you could consult previous posts about intriguing African fictionEast Asian fiction, European fiction, Latin American fiction, or Australian mysteries from the past few years.

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New Fiction Roundup – July 2018

7/3: Dear Mrs. Bird by AJ Pearce – In 1940s London, Emmy takes a job at the London Evening Chronicle and ends up not as a journalist but rather as a typist to an advice columnist. When she sees all the letters that go unanswered, she begins responding on her own.

book cover image of clock dance7/10: Clock Dance by Anne Tyler – Willa Drake finds renewed purpose in her life when she spontaneously flies to Baltimore to take care of a woman she only tangentially knows, that woman’s nine-year-old daughter and their dog, Airplane.

7/10: The Lido by Libby Page – An anxiety-riddled cub reporter for a small London paper is assigned to cover the closing of a local rec center and bonds with an 86-year-old widow who has swum in the community pool every day since childhood. A novel of connection and community across generations. Continue reading “New Fiction Roundup – July 2018”

Australian mysteries

Australia has long produced some great mystery writers: Peter Temple, writing the Jack Irish series about a lawyer and gambler turned PI, as well as a number of standalone crime novels; Kerry Greenwood’s post-World War I series featuring private detective Phryne Fisher, to name just two. But in just the last year, authors from Down Under have delivered two new excellent mystery series.

The Dry by Jane Harper
Federal Agent Aaron Falk left his tiny hometown of Kiewarra 20 years ago after the suspicious death of a friend. Now he gets word that another friend from that time, Luke, and Luke’s family have all been killed. Luke’s dad sends Aaron a letter that simply says “Luke lied. You lied. Be at the funeral.” And so he returns home to try to figure out what happened, and to try and come to terms with the death of his friend two decades before. This has a great cast of characters, two interesting mysteries split across 20 years, and Harper writes so realistically of the drought-stricken Outback that you can practically feel the hot wind coming off the sheep farms.

Crimson Lake by Candice Fox
A year ago, Sydney detective Ted Conkaffey pulled over on the side of a rural road to adjust his fishing equipment; a girl at the bus stop nearby went missing at nearly the same time, and was found days later assaulted and left for dead. Ted was accused but not convicted of the crime, released from jail with no job, no family or friends, and no prospects. He fled north, to the steamy, swampy, crocodile-infested wetlands of Crimson Lake. At loose ends, struggling for money, his lawyer connects him with private investigator Amanda Pharrell, herself convicted of murder when she was a teenager. Ted and Amanda make uneasy partners, but jump in together on the case of a very successful local author who has gone missing. Fox weaves together an interesting current mystery (is murder-by-crocodile possible?), while also teasing aspects of Amanda and Ted’s pasts in a way that will leave you impatient for the sequel.

~ posted by Andrea G.

New Fiction Roundup – June 2018

6/5: The Book of M by Peng Shepherd – In a near-future world, people’s shadows begin to disappear. Once their shadow is lost, so too are all their memories. Ory and his wife Max have so far escaped the Forgetting, but when Max’s shadow disappears and she runs away, Ory is determined to follow and find her.

6/5: Florida by Lauren Groff – A collection of short stories set in Florida, full of storms, snakes, sinkholes and secrets. By the author of Fates and Furies. Continue reading “New Fiction Roundup – June 2018”

Intriguing East Asian Fiction

Did you hear the announcement earlier this year, that the National Book Foundation will be adding a new award for the first time in 36 years, honoring works in translation? With that news, it’s a good time to continue highlighting some interesting international fiction published in 2017-18, this time from East Asia – Japan, Korea and China.

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