#BookBingoNW2017: Read a book adapted into a movie

Not to be overly critical of a billion dollar industry or anything, but I think Hollywood has an originality problem. Books with any kind of following are immediately optioned for films – think Gone Girl, Girl on the Train, and The Martian. In other words, we’re not lacking for books that will satisfy the “Adapted into a Movie” book bingo square.

And if you’re like me, if you’ve loved the book, you’ve got some high expectations for the film. The titles I’ve suggested here are complex books made into films that didn’t disappoint.

Daniel Woodrell’s Winter’s Bone follows 17-year-old Ree Dolly through a poverty-stricken Ozarks landscape on a desperate quest to find her father. The highly acclaimed southern gothic film directed by Debra Granik featured Jennifer Lawrence in her breakout role. Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2017: Read a book adapted into a movie”

Page to Screen: My Cousin Rachel.

It was my idea, after all. Lately as we’ve seen readers and filmgoers gobbling up great twisty psychological suspense such as Gone Girl and The Girl on the Train, I kept thinking they should make a fresh version Daphne Du Maurier’s classic tale of the devious anti-heroine known as My Cousin Rachel. Sixty-five years after its original publication, the book stands up extremely well, and makes a terrific suggestion for fans of gothic film and fiction including such modern descendants as Kate Morton, Sarah WatersLauren Forrey, Eleanor Wasserberg, Catronia Ward, John Harwood. I mean, it pretty much has it all – lush historical trappings, an irresistible villainess, passion, poison –  and it is desperately overdue for a fresh version. Check out the trailer for this 1952 potboiler starring Olivia deHavilland and “bright new star” Richard Burton (“Was she woman, or witch!? Madonna or murderess!? … She gives men the promise of ecstasy, and a life of torment!”)

Hugely fun on a rainy Saturday afternoon, but we’re definitely ready for something a bit more contemporary. I can’t wait to see the new film with Rachel Weisz and Sam Claflin, which looks gorgeous and treacherous, as it should:

. Continue reading “Page to Screen: My Cousin Rachel.”

Books to Movies: 2017 and Beyond

Want to catch up on must-reads books before they become movies? Are you excited to see – or dreading to watch – your favorite characters come to life? Here are some of the most anticipated adaptations coming to a screen near you. Check out the books now, while there’s still time! Continue reading “Books to Movies: 2017 and Beyond”

Book Bingo: Turned into a Movie

– Posted by Misha.

Book Bingo Turned MovieThis summer The Seattle Public Library, in partnership with Seattle Arts & Lectures, is excited to offer a summer reading program for adults called Summer Book Bingo! In order to help you along on your quest to complete your bingo sheet, we have pulled together some book suggestions based on each category. Stay tuned for more throughout the summer!

Every year I love to put together our Oscars slash “Made into a Movie” display at the Central Library, so I was thrilled to see “Turned into a Movie” as a Summer Book Bingo category. What is amazing every year is to see just how many films are made with novels, nonfiction, short stories or comics as source material. Hollywood has caught on to what so many readers already know–that some of the best stories are already out there and that fans of the book will usually go see the movie, too.

12700353     6587879   52258  18007564 Continue reading “Book Bingo: Turned into a Movie”

Romantic Wednesdays: If You Liked The Fault in Our Stars

Posted by Eric G.

John Green’s popular and acclaimed novel The Fault in Our Stars gets the big screen treatment this week! Here are some books that form a complementary reading constellation.

The Fault in Our Stars by John GreenSomebody Up There Hates You by Hollis SeamonThe Summer I Found You by Jolene B. Perry

Somebody Up There Hates You by Hollis Seamon

On the surface this story of cancer-stricken teens seems very similar to Green’s novel, but this humorous, moving story stands on its own. The snarky narrator Richard doesn’t have long to live, but is making the most of his remaining days in the hospice wing with Sylvie, another teen awaiting the same fate. Continue reading “Romantic Wednesdays: If You Liked The Fault in Our Stars”