Bus Reads for October

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in October:

Into the Jungle by Erica Ferencik. Running from her past, Lily seeks a different sort of adventure after her teaching job in Bolivia ends and her listlessness grows tiring. In meeting Omar her new adventure begins. She heads into the jungle to the village he was born in, in a jungle where everything is trying to kill you. This book surprised me at first: I thought the girl was crazy to go off into the jungle, but she really does grow throughout the novel. She doesn’t take on this new life until she has no choice, but you can see despite some of her protests she has learned and embraced her jungle family. I also enjoyed the added elements of mysticism. Continue reading “Bus Reads for October”

Bus Reads for September

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in September:

Circe by Madeline Miller. The story of Circe, the daughter of the sun god Helios, banished to an island for Zeus believes her to be a threat. Unlike other children of the gods Circe has her own power – that of witchcraft. On her island she focuses on her craft, turns evil visiting men into pigs (my favorite part), and encounters other major and minor characters in Greek mythology. The guest that makes the most impact is Odysseus. I really, really, really enjoyed this book however I felt like a complete idiot reading it – I didn’t realize how much I didn’t know about Greek mythology! Continue reading “Bus Reads for September”

Bus Reads for August

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in August:

Go Set A Watchman by Harper Lee. I’m glad I gave myself a bit of time before I read this book. To Kill a Mockingbird was one of those books that really reached me, that molded me, and still lives with me to this day. Go Set a Watchman was what I needed to read now just like I needed Mockingbird back then. We live in a world with people on pedestals, pedestals that hide the wrong–this book reveals people are people, not gods. For those that grew up with Scout I think this is a read you can respect. I know there is controversy, I know how important Atticus is, but that’s the thing with those on pedestals; they eventually fall and what’s left determines who we are and what we stand for. Continue reading “Bus Reads for August”

Bus Reads for July

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in July:

Early Riser by Jasper Fforde. I really enjoyed this book, I think the only issue I sometimes have with Jasper is that it sometimes feels like in his books there are inside jokes I’m not aware of so it takes me a bit longer to truly get into his novels. Once I’m in it though and things start to come together better in my mind I’m good to go. And this was quite a tricky little novel that really kept me reading. I don’t want to give too much away, but the concept of hibernation during winter – considering the current way of the world – was brilliant. It was dystopian light with intrigue and suspense, but in a completely nerdy way. Continue reading “Bus Reads for July”

Bus Reads for June

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time.

Here’s what I read on the bus in June:

Where the Crawdads SingCover of Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens
This felt like a book that will stick with me for quite a while. This book has so many layers and brought me into the story, never revealing itself fully until the very end. Kya Clark has lived in the marsh for years on her own. Shy and intelligent, the townsfolk only know her as the “Marsh Girl,” some even labeling her harshly as trash, letting rumors and gossip form the basis of their opinions. Abandoned by her mother, her siblings, and eventually her mean spirited father, Kya survives on her own learning the ways of the marsh and only interacting with a select few. She goes to Jumpin’ when gas for her boat is needed, the Piggly Wiggly when she can’t get supplies on her own, and also to Tate, a boy who teaches her to read and opens up her world to the future she will have. As her relationship with Tate turns into something more, she will find that same pattern of abandonment over and over again in her life, with the last instance being Chase Andrews, the golden boy of Barkeley Cove. When Chase is found dead and the law turns their eyes to Kya, the townspeople will have to decide if they will let their prejudice result in sacrifice of the “Marsh Girl”. Continue reading “Bus Reads for June”