Bus Reads for July

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in July:

Early Riser by Jasper Fforde. I really enjoyed this book, I think the only issue I sometimes have with Jasper is that it sometimes feels like in his books there are inside jokes I’m not aware of so it takes me a bit longer to truly get into his novels. Once I’m in it though and things start to come together better in my mind I’m good to go. And this was quite a tricky little novel that really kept me reading. I don’t want to give too much away, but the concept of hibernation during winter – considering the current way of the world – was brilliant. It was dystopian light with intrigue and suspense, but in a completely nerdy way. Continue reading “Bus Reads for July”

Bus Reads for June

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time.

Here’s what I read on the bus in June:

Where the Crawdads SingCover of Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens
This felt like a book that will stick with me for quite a while. This book has so many layers and brought me into the story, never revealing itself fully until the very end. Kya Clark has lived in the marsh for years on her own. Shy and intelligent, the townsfolk only know her as the “Marsh Girl,” some even labeling her harshly as trash, letting rumors and gossip form the basis of their opinions. Abandoned by her mother, her siblings, and eventually her mean spirited father, Kya survives on her own learning the ways of the marsh and only interacting with a select few. She goes to Jumpin’ when gas for her boat is needed, the Piggly Wiggly when she can’t get supplies on her own, and also to Tate, a boy who teaches her to read and opens up her world to the future she will have. As her relationship with Tate turns into something more, she will find that same pattern of abandonment over and over again in her life, with the last instance being Chase Andrews, the golden boy of Barkeley Cove. When Chase is found dead and the law turns their eyes to Kya, the townspeople will have to decide if they will let their prejudice result in sacrifice of the “Marsh Girl”. Continue reading “Bus Reads for June”

Bus Reads for May

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time.

Here’s what I read on the bus in May:

Bearskin by James A. McLaughlin
A nice little thriller, reminded me a bit of Josh Bazell’s book Beat the Reaper, which I also enjoyed. Rice Moore is seeking a hideout from the Mexican cartel he betrayed, he finds that in the Appalachian Mountains working on a nature preserve, but its not all peace and quiet. The bears protected on the preserve are found dead, while he searches for the poachers it brings him a little too close to the past he was running from.

Continue reading “Bus Reads for May”

Bus Reads for April

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time.

Here’s what I read on the bus in April:

Book cover image for FreshwaterFreshwater by Akwaeke Emezi. This book is so hard to put into words with its madness and dark tales of a person consumed by multiple identities. Born in Nigeria to parents who desperately wanted her, yet ultimately fail her, The Ada goes through life without the support system one usually has. As she travels to America for college, those selves evolve even more after she experiences a trauma. Her “identities” take her, guide her, and force her through her life – she at times fights against them, at times succumbs to their whims. Eventually as an adult it all comes to a breaking point. Such a beautiful and tragic read…I couldn’t put it down. The author does an amazing job of making the identities full-blown characters, and with the description of their world within The Ada and beyond. Continue reading “Bus Reads for April”

Bus Reads for March

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time.

Here’s what I read on the bus in March:

If We Were Villains by M. L. Rio. On the day that Oliver is released from prison, Detective Colborne, who worked the case and is now retired, has come to ask a question. Oliver agrees to answer, but in his own way. He takes him back 10 years to when he and his classmates at Dellecher Classical Conservatory were working their way through Shakespeare. In their fourth year, the tragedy that was so popular in Shakespeare finally takes its toll. I was a little worried that the Shakespeare would overwhelm me, but the author did an amazing job of making the story accessible for everyone – both those enthralled by the stage and those who prefer to sit in the shadows. I also loved all the characters; they felt so real and flawed. Continue reading “Bus Reads for March”