Bus Reads for February

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time.

Here’s what I read on the bus in February:

Book cover image for BrassBrass by Xhenet Aliu. A story of a mother and a daughter and how one’s path sometimes winds it’s way differently than expected. Chapters were told in alternating voices of the mother and the daughter. I loved that you could see the mom’s path unfolding to bring her daughter in the world and the daughter attempting to discover her father and who she is. It was a beautifully told story, one I couldn’t put down. Very much a story of the “American Dream”.

Book cover image for The Other EinsteinThe Other Einstein by Marie Benedict. A fiction book that enlightened me to a real person I knew nothing about…I honestly didn’t even know Einstein was married once, let alone twice. And while it’s fiction based, you really have to wonder if Einstein’s success was rooted in his relationship with his first wife, Mileva Maric. A brilliant mind herself, she gave up so much for her relationship with Einstein. Einstein was also someone I knew little about, but from this read I now consider him a completely selfish person. Too often throughout history men have taken credit for a woman’s work—and I can see how this may be a repeat of that very case.

What are you reading on your commute? Tag your reads on social media #splbusreads.

~posted by Kara P.

Bus Reads for January

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time.

Here’s what I read on the bus in January:

The River at Night by Erica Ferenik. Every year four friends, Wini, Pia, Sandra, and Rachel plan a trip, to spend time together and get away from everyday life. This year it’s a five day white water rafting trip in the Maine wilderness. Wini is not too keen on the idea and everything is telling her not to go, but these are her best friends. Together these women set off on this once in a lifetime adventure; however, all does not go as planned and it will take everything they have to try to survive. A fun read, quick and exciting. It had moments of predictability, but the language and writing was fantastic. She really captured place and setting well. While the narrator Wini, was definitely my gal, I would have liked to hear more from the other women, maybe chapters back and forth. However, you get their stories throughout so they become known to you. Continue reading “Bus Reads for January”

Bus Reads for December

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in December:

Sal by Mick Kitson. A beautiful book despite its tough subject matter. The sisters, Sal and Peppa, are adorable and charming. Sal, the oldest, has been taking care of her younger sister for years as her mom drinks the days away. Her mother’s boyfriend uses the mother’s addiction to his advantage and sexually assaults Sal numerous times. Despite this Sal is tough and getting prepared because the boyfriend has made it known Peppa is next. With Sal’s resourcefulness and determination the girls will flee to the woods and start a life of self-sufficiency. ​Also, there is so much hope in this novel! Continue reading “Bus Reads for December”

Bus Reads for November

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in November:

There Therebook cover image of There There by Tommy Orange. It was one of those books I loved, but wanted more. I want more book, I want a sequel, I want more of the story, more, more, more, but it was beautiful and tragic and a needed voice. This story centers around the Oakland powwow that takes place at the end of the novel, those who are a part of it, those who want to be a part of it, and those that bring in harm. You have multiple character perspectives and as you read you start to see the connections being made. This book had brilliance and poetry in its commentary on the lives of urban Indians. The author also brings in history and stereotype and blows everything wide open. Continue reading “Bus Reads for November”

Bus Reads for October

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in October:

Our Homesick Songs by Emma Hooper. A small fishing island in Newfoundland is home to few. As the fish began to vanish, so too did the island’s inhabitants, leaving one by one to seek a life elsewhere. This is the story of two generations of Connors and those that refuse to leave the only home they’ve ever known. Aiden and Martha take turns working on the main land to support their children Cora and Finn. Finn has a plan to bring the fish back and Cora, after decorating every abandoned home to look like far away lands, makes a plan herself. Aiden and Martha’s stories are also told in flashback chapters connecting it all. A beautiful novel of family and hope. Continue reading “Bus Reads for October”