Bus Reads for October

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in October:

Our Homesick Songs by Emma Hooper. A small fishing island in Newfoundland is home to few. As the fish began to vanish, so too did the island’s inhabitants, leaving one by one to seek a life elsewhere. This is the story of two generations of Connors and those that refuse to leave the only home they’ve ever known. Aiden and Martha take turns working on the main land to support their children Cora and Finn. Finn has a plan to bring the fish back and Cora, after decorating every abandoned home to look like far away lands, makes a plan herself. Aiden and Martha’s stories are also told in flashback chapters connecting it all. A beautiful novel of family and hope. Continue reading “Bus Reads for October”

Bus Reads for September

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in September:

The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore by Kim Fu: Five girls, Nita, Isabel, Andee, Siobhan, and Dina are selected by their camp leader, Jan, to go on a kayaking trip. These girls already have established friendships and rivalries that shape how they will fend for themselves after their camp leader meets a tragic fate. The narration goes from girl to girl as well and includes flashbacks of camp life before, during, and after the incident. It was thrilling, almost edge of your seat read at times, but also the story of these girls as adults; it was interesting to see how one moment can have an impact on the rest of your life. Continue reading “Bus Reads for September”

Bus Reads for August

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in August:

Book cover image for Heart BerriesHeart Berries by Terese Mailhot: After checking herself into a psych ward Mailhot begins journaling to her ex-lover. She grapples with her past, her present, and her future as well as the cultural responsibility and weight of being First Nations. Her words of madness, love, strength, heartbreak are still running through my head. I loved the beautiful rawness of Mailhot’s voice, almost stream-of-consciousness as you read it; hers is a voice we so desperately need. It was a book that stayed with me long after the last page was read. Continue reading “Bus Reads for August”

Bus Reads for July

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in July:

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas: One of the main themes I loved about this book was the character’s experience of being two different people in two different worlds and having to fight against the stereotypes of where you come from. This book is a must read. I’m so thankful it’s a YA novel; seriously, make this a part of every school curriculum! If you still find yourself struggling to understand and can’t see your privilege in the world we live in then read this. The hate you give is still out there and there is still so much work to do. So much to fight for! The movie will be released in October! Continue reading “Bus Reads for July”

Bus Reads for June

Commuting to Seattle by bus 5 days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus this past June:

How To Be Safe by Tom McAllister

This book takes place in the aftermath of a school shooting and hits so close to home. Tom has his fingers on the vein of society, maybe even deeper than that. All I know is as a woman in this culture of ours he nailed my fears, my insecurities, and some of the most terrifying interactions I have experienced in regards to harassment. On top of that our devotion to guns; how we interpret violence. So much of what I read has actually happened. This book may bring controversy, but its a needed one that lays all our sins to bare. Continue reading “Bus Reads for June”