March Literary Holidays

Aside from calendar noted holidays in March like Purim and Saint Patrick’s day, there are a few literary days of note that might peak your interest.  

On March 2nd there is Read Across America day, which also happens to be Dr. Seuss’ birthday. It was created by the National Education Association as a day to devote to getting children excited about reading. Dr. Seuss’ birthday was selected as the day to encourage reading on. So enjoy Oh, The Places You’ll Go! or Green Eggs and Ham both by Dr. Seuss. Or branch out from Dr. Seuss and try one of the books listed here Our Favorite Children’s Picture Books of 2017 or Race and Social Justice Books for Children K-5.

Continue reading “March Literary Holidays”

January Literary Celebrations

January comes with a break from the holidays, but if you enjoy celebrating and love books, here are some ideas for literary celebrations for January.

We’ll start off with Tolkien day on January 3. It’s his birthday and a day celebrated by the Tolkien Society. They recommend a very simple celebration: find somewhere to have a drink, and at 9 PM make a toast with friends simply saying, “The Professor!” Let me suggest a couple books about Tolkien if you’d like to enrich your knowledge of him. A great book to share with children or just read to yourself is John Ronald’s Dragons: The Story of J.R.R. Tolkien by Caroline McAlister. With gorgeous illustrations it tells a little about his life. Another option is Mythmaker by Anne E. Neimark, a thoroughly researched biography exploring Tolkien’s extensive interests that influenced his writing. Continue reading “January Literary Celebrations”

Favorite Picture Books of 2017

The “Best Books of the Year” lists are out in abundance, and your Children’s Librarians from the Seattle Public Library are eager to share some of their favorite books of the year as well.

Picture books will always be my favorite format for children’s books. There’s so much variety, so much invention, and they simply provide a perfect way to explore the world one book at a time. You are never too old to enjoy the magical combination of illustration and storytelling, and 2017 was a particularly great year for picture books. We have 50 favorites to share with you!  Below are just a few books I found particularly special.

Every year, I seem to find one picture book I want to share with everyone, and this year that book was The Rooster Who Would Not Be Quiet by Carmen Agra Deedy. It’s a fantastic read-aloud, and little ones will surely want to crow along with you! Kee Kee Kree Kee!  Colorful and quirky illustrations bring this story of resilience to life. The town is too noisy, and its residents are up in arms. But when a new mayor begins to enforce a glut of rules, the town does finally grow quiet – too quiet – until this determined rooster shows the citizens just how important it is to sing your own song, and to sing a song for others. It’s a nuanced exploration of community building and social justice. Continue reading “Favorite Picture Books of 2017”

Cultivating a Love of Nature with Children

The clouds are disappearing and the temperatures are warming, which means the summer months are just within reach in the Pacific Northwest! Take a book or two along as you and your kiddos head to the park or the beach. You’ll satisfy the curiosity of those little scientists and enhance your family’s appreciation for our astounding natural world. Just take care to keep those library books from falling into Puget Sound!

Goodbye Summer, Hello Autumn by Kenard Pak
Recommended for ages 2+
Revel in the warm glow of these stunning illustrations as you and your child read about summer’s gradual transition to autumn. The main character chats easily with the elements and creatures of the natural world, creating a sense of friendliness and compassion between humans and nature. Continue reading “Cultivating a Love of Nature with Children”

The Wondrous World of the Central Library

Oddfellow's OrphanageEmily Winfield Martin is the writer of the blog The Black Apple that I have been following for eons it seems. She has also written a few children’s books that are beautiful, delightful, and available from the library; one being Oddfellow’s Orphanage. That particular story tells us about Delia, a silent albino girl, who discovers a family of sorts in the other children living at Oddfellow’s Orphanage. Continue reading “The Wondrous World of the Central Library”