#BookBingoNW2021 BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, or Person of Color) Food Writing

Need a suggestion for your BIPOC Food Writing Book Bingo square? Expand your reading (and eating) palette with these tasty, filling and thoroughly engrossing memoirs and cookbooks!*

Crying in H Mart by Michelle Zauner

Noted indie rock musician Zauner (Japanese Breakfast) has penned a heartfelt and captivating memoir about growing up Asian American in a predominantly white Pacific Northwest community and her complex relationship with her mother, with whom she shared a fierce love of Korean food. Zauner writes candidly about her mother’s early death from cancer, her attempts to care for her and her grief, weaving evocative descriptions of Korean dishes and cooking throughout. Currently available at most Library locations as a Peak Pick.

Notes From a Young Black Chef by Kwame Onwuachi 

Top Chef fans may remember Onwuachi from Season 13, when he wowed the judges with his pickled shrimp with cucumber onion salad, among other delectable dishes that drew on his Nigerian heritage. In this absorbing memoir, he recounts his journey from a rough childhood in the Bronx to working in three-star Michelin restaurants and finally opening his own highly anticipated restaurant before he turned 30. Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2021 BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, or Person of Color) Food Writing”

#BookBingoNW2021 Cli-fi or Environmental Non-fiction

The Cli-fi/Environmental Non-Fiction square offers lots of good reading options! From visions of how the world might look after a climate apocalypse, to intensely personal stories of connection with the land; from accounts of how we got to this point in time, to examinations of the intersection of capitalism and climate; and much more. Check out a few suggestions below to get you started, and find many, many more on our Cli-fi or Environmental Non-fiction booklist.

The Disaster Tourist by Yun Ko-eun
Fiction
Yona works for a travel agency, Jungle, which arranges high-end vacations to areas ravaged by disasters: floods, avalanches, earthquakes, etc. Her most recent assignment is as an evaluator, joining four vacationers on an island off the coast of Vietnam with a somewhat lackluster sinkhole. With the local economy now entirely dependent on Jungle’s tourists, Yona discovers a plan to punch up the drama – and the danger. This is a fast-paced satire that interrogates issues of capitalism, tourism, and climate change. Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2021 Cli-fi or Environmental Non-fiction”

Tired of Grim Dystopias? Try Solarpunk!

Solarpunk is a relatively newer subset of the cyberpunk and steampunk genres, being introduced in 2008. Solarpunk focuses on what the future might be like using renewable resources. Often humanity is managing to coexist in a more harmonious way with the world and while natural disasters might not have been avoided, they are less likely to destroy the planet. Solarpunk focuses on futures that are not dystopias and as much as I love a dystopia novel, it’s great to read something with hope for the future. So take a look at these!

Sunvault: Stories of Solarpunk and Eco-speculation is a great place to start. It’s a collected anthology of stories, artwork, and poetry. Tales of impending ecological doom with hope at the end, with some stories being described as hauntingly beautiful.

Pacific Edge by Kim Stanley Robinson takes place in 2065 in California. People live in harmony with nature but this idyllic lifestyle is being threatened by the desire for power and money over others, people’s greed. This is the last book in a trilogy, you can read the other two first but they take place in 2047 (The Wild Shore: Book 1 ) and 2027 (The Gold Coast: Book 2 ) with different main characters. It helps to set the world but your true solarpunk adventure will be found in 2065 with Pacific Edge.

Continue reading “Tired of Grim Dystopias? Try Solarpunk!”

#BookBingoNW2018: About the Environment

One of the many things I appreciate about the Book Bingo categories is that quite a few can be filled by both fiction or nonfiction, leaving the choice up to the reader. Today let’s look at the “About the Environment” category, which at first glance lends itself primarily to nonfiction, and instead see what fiction we could read.

Book cover image of When the Killing's DoneT.C. Boyle has written several novels in which environmental concerns play Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2018: About the Environment”