Mayor Jenny Durkan on the Book that Made the Difference

This past November, Seattle swore in a new Mayor and City Councilmember, and we here at ShelfTalk thought this would be a great opportunity to continue our series of posts in which we invited your representatives to share books that have meant a lot to them. This time, we asked them “What book was most influential in your life or career and why?” Mayor Jenny Durkan reflects on a book that has had a powerful influence on so many readers, herself included.

“What book was most influential in your life or career and why?”

To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

I have read this book many times, and each time I am struck by something new.  Two scenes were particularly influential on my career. The most significant is Atticus’ closing arguments, in which he refers to the courts as the “great leveler”. To him this means every person has a right to justice, regardless of race, personal circumstances, station in life, or background. This view of justice has inspired me to work on issues of inequality and discrimination. While we have not achieved Atticus’ vision of universal justice, I have fought to realize this goal for my whole career. Continue reading “Mayor Jenny Durkan on the Book that Made the Difference”

City Council Reads – Teresa Mosqueda, Citywide Position 8

This past November, Seattle swore in a new Mayor and City Councilmember, and we here at ShelfTalk thought this would be a great opportunity to continue our series of posts in which we invited your representatives to share books that have meant a lot to them. This time, we asked them “What book was most influential in your life or career and why?” Next week we’ll feature Mayor Durkan’s response, but let’s start things off with Seattle’s newest City Councilmember, Teresa Mosqueda

Teresa Mosqueda, Seattle CIty Council Position 8, Citywide.

“What book was most influential in your life or career and why?”


Sickness and Wealth: The Corporate Assault on Global Health, edited by Meredith Fort, Mary Anne Mercer, and Oscar Gish.

Continue reading “City Council Reads – Teresa Mosqueda, Citywide Position 8”

City Council Reads – Lorena Gonzalez, Citywide Position

The Seattle City Council was sworn in last month, and we here at ShelfTalk thought asking them about books would be a great way to learn more about our councilmembers. We asked them to tell us about books they’ve read (or almost read), books they want to read, books that inspired them, books they feel guilty about not finishing, or books that they think people should read. We’ll feature their responses as we receive them. Next up is Councilmember Lorena Gonzalez

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An inspiring book to you personally or a book that changed your life: 

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Revolt of the Cockroach People  by Oscar Zeta Acosta – I read this book as a young adult and it changed the way I looked at the world considerably

Continue reading “City Council Reads – Lorena Gonzalez, Citywide Position”

City Council Reads – Sally Bagshaw, District 7

The Seattle City Council was sworn in last month, and we here at ShelfTalk thought asking them about books would be a great way to learn more about our councilmembers. We asked them to tell us about books they’ve read (or almost read), books they want to read, books that inspired them, books they feel guilty about not finishing, or books that they think people should read. We’ll feature their responses as we receive them. Next is Councilmember Sally Bagshaw from District 7.

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The last book(s) I read  

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I just spent a blissful week with my husband away from Seattle and I had time – for the first time in ages — to read read read:  Barbara Kingsolver’s Flight Behavior; Eugene Robinson’s Disintegration; Garth Stein’s Art of Racing in the Rain, and finishing tonight The Book Thief by Markus Zusak.  I loved them all. Continue reading “City Council Reads – Sally Bagshaw, District 7”

City Council Reads – Rob Johnson, District 4

The Seattle City Council was sworn in last month, and we here at ShelfTalk thought asking them about books would be a great way to learn more about our councilmembers. We asked them to tell us about books they’ve read (or almost read), books they want to read, books that inspired them, books they feel guilty about not finishing, or books that they think people should read. We’ll feature their responses as we receive them. First up is Councilmember Rob Johnson from District 4. 

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The last book(s) you read

Our Man in HavanaThe GoldfinchAll the Light We Cannot see Continue reading “City Council Reads – Rob Johnson, District 4”