The Year’s Best Crime Writing: The 2019 Edgar Awards

Pulitzers, Bookers, Nobels – bah! For crime fiction fans it’s all about the Edgars. Last night the winners in several categories of crime and thriller books were announced at the Mystery Writers of America’s annual Edgar Awards ceremony: here’s a full list of these titles in our catalog, including non-fiction, books for children and teens, and the Mary Higgins Clark Awards for less violent novels with strong heroines.

As for the felonious Best In Show, we give you the nominees for the category of Best Novel:

Continue reading “The Year’s Best Crime Writing: The 2019 Edgar Awards”

Upcoming Thrilling Tales from our Story Time for Grown Ups.

For over a decade, every other Monday at noon listeners have flocked to Thrilling Tales, the Library’s story time for grownups, spending their lunch hour rapt in suspenseful narratives. Janice Leadingham, a local bookseller said in a recent article in City Arts: “Especially for impatient people, it’s good because it slows things down a bit. For one hour, you can just be.” In a recent front page article in The Seattle Times, audience member Zachary Valenter said of Thrilling Tales emcee David Wright, “He’s one of the best storytellers I’ve ever listened to. We come every week that he does the show.”

Monday, Feb. 22, 2016. Downtown reader services librarian, David Wright reading the short story, People Don’t do Such Things by Ruth Rendell during the “A Story Time for Grownups” at the Seattle downtown public library.

Find out what all the fuss is about: drop by the Central Library at five minutes past noon on any of the following days, and remember just how fun it was to sit back, relax and be read to. Continue reading “Upcoming Thrilling Tales from our Story Time for Grown Ups.”

Crime Comics: Fiction and Non-Fiction

Crime comics were big in the 1940s and 50s, but when adoption of the Comics Code Authority in 1954 limited the types and severity of crime cartoonists could depict, their popularity waned. In recent decades crime comics have gained in popularity and stature as several talented creators have worked to resurrect and reinvent the genre, both in fiction and non-fiction forms. Continue reading “Crime Comics: Fiction and Non-Fiction”

Crime: Philip Kerr – Back to Berlin.

Find Philip Kerr's Berlin Noir in the Seattle Public Library catalog.Way back in 1989, British author Philip Kerr published March Violets, a hardboiled mystery in which tough, tarnished private investigator Bernhard Gunther plunged into the depthless iniquities of Nazi Berlin in search of some small sliver of justice. This was followed up by two other moody period novels featuring Gunther – The Pale Criminal and A German Requiem, and all three books were subsequently published together as Berlin Noir, a trilogy that deeply influenced much of today’s WWII thrillers by such authors as Alan Furst, J. Robert Janes, Paul Grossman, Joseph Kanon and Jonathan Rabb. Quite few readers have mentioned Berlin Noir to me as one of their all-time favorites, and I agree. Continue reading “Crime: Philip Kerr – Back to Berlin.”

Crime: 2013 Edgar Award nominees

It’s that time of year, and the Mystery Writers of America have announced their nominees for the 2013 Edgar Awards. However you feel about awards – winners, losers, what all that means – if you read crime fiction, the following titles/series are all worthy of your notice. Continue reading “Crime: 2013 Edgar Award nominees”