Audiobooks Voiced by Your Favorite Seattle Actors

It has probably happened to you. You suddenly sense that the performer you’re enjoying live on stage sounds hauntingly familiar. What you may not have realized is that theirs was the voice reading into your airpods on that morning’s commute. Here’s just a small sampling of local talent on audio.

One of Those Malibu Nights, by Ellizabeth Adler, read by Julie Briskman. You’ve likely seen her at ACT Theatre or the Seattle Rep, most recently in Indecent. Now hear her relate how handsome Private Eye Mac Reilly and his intrepid  gal Friday Sunny Alvarez brave the wilds of Malibu  and southern France to save the life of a beautiful movie star from a stalker.

Heyday, by Kurt Andersen, read by Charles Leggett. Veteran character actor Leggett has appeared at Intiman, the Village Theater, ACT and the Seattle Rep, most recently alongside with Julie Briskman in Tiny Beautiful Things.  Now hear how his knack for characters and accents get a full workout in Andersen’s sweeping historical novel.

Dogtripping, by David Rosenfelt, read by Jeff Steitzer. Local theater legend Steitzer has appeared on too many stages over the years to name. Gamers do double-takes around him, little suspecting he is the voice of HALO. Audiobook fans can enjoy his affable baritone and wry comic timing in mystery writer Rosenfelt’s rollicking non-fiction account of a cross-country trip, together with twenty-five rescue dogs.

The Long-Legged Fly, by James Sallis, narrated by G. Valmont Thomas. Another beloved Northwest theater icon until his untimely death in 2017, Thomas was well-known for stellar turns in everything ranging from Shakespeare to August Wilson to the Rocky Horror Picture Show. Thomas brought his great poetic and dramatic range to all six of Sallis’s elegaic, existential hard-boiled crime novels, leaving a moving audiobook legacy for his many fans.

We’ve barely scratched the surface, so check out this list of audiobooks read by local performers.

     ~posted by David W.

Thrilling Tales for the Holidays

Now that Hallowe’en is past, we approach the holidays with visions of murder dancing in our heads. We’re talking about the next few months of Thrilling Tales – Seattle Public Library’s popular Story time for Grownups, of course!

It all starts this Sunday: November 17, 7 p.m. with a Storytime for Grownups at Third Place Books, Seward Park of the story Plan 19, by Jack Ritchie
Fred and Hector have cooked up eighteen separate plans for their big prison break, but it takes Big Duke to add that one missing ingredient. This time, they can’t fail!

Monday November 18, noon: Dances With Ghosts, by Joseph Bruchac. Harley Bigbear is haunted enough, without the angry ghosts of white men banging on his trailer door. Gritty Indian Country noir by this prize-winning indigenous author. Continue reading “Thrilling Tales for the Holidays”

If only my library were in a bar… Booktoberfest 2019!

Think of it: the nerdy erudition of your neighborhood library, crossed with the convivial bonhomie of your local pub. That’s Booktoberfest, now in its fifth year! Trivia, karaoke, happy hours, all with a bookish twist. Storytimes, art class, and literary readings, all in bars! Come out and celebrate the season with us. Here’s what’s in store: Continue reading “If only my library were in a bar… Booktoberfest 2019!”

If You Like Tana French

We librarians hear a lot about readers’ favorite writers, and some names come up over and over again. One of these is Irish mystery writer Tana French, whose gritty Dublin Murder Squad series provides the perfect blend of police procedure and intricate psychological suspense. Only trouble is, she doesn’t write them fast enough. No worries: here are some other terrific titles – many by less well known writers – that are sure to please.

The Dark Lake, by Sarah Bailey. When her former classmate is found murdered, Det. Sgt. Gemma Woodstock uncovers puzzling mysteries in the victim’s life, from her abrupt departure from a dream teaching job to her run-down existence in spite of wealthy family ties.

Lost You, by Haylen Beck. After a closing elevator door separates them, a single mother on vacation with her son discovers he has been abducted by another woman who claims she is his mother!

One Small Sacrifice, by Hilary Davidson. An apparent suicide. A mysterious disappearance. Did one man get away with murder—twice? It is Det. Sheryn Sterling job to find out. A riveting police procedural with a strong female detective and an intriguing antagonist. Continue reading “If You Like Tana French”

Longer nights: Stranger tales

You can feel it in the air, can’t you: Autumn is just around  the corner, and here at the library that means gathering around to hear some spooky stories. Once again this Fall, we’ll be presenting our ‘Ales from the Crypt spooky story time in bars around town (visit the Booktoberfest page soon for details, or mark your calendar now for one of these dates: Tuesday Oct 22, 8 p.m. – Palace Art Bar, Georgetown; Sunday, Oct 27, 8 p.m. – Tippe & Drague Alehouse, Beacon Hill; Wednesday, Oct 30, 8 p.m. – Floating Bridge Brewing, University District. We will also have a pair of spooky readings as part of this year’s LitCrawl.

For those who prefer to get scared in broad daylight, don’t miss our regular lunch hour Thrilling Tales program as we shift into the spooky season of the year:

Monday, September 9, noon: The Painted Smile, by William Kent Krueger. Ten-year-old Oliver believes he’s Sherlock Holmes, and he isn’t the only one: just ask Professor Moriarty. Krueger’s homage to Arthur Conan Doyle is full of fun surprises. Continue reading “Longer nights: Stranger tales”