Kids Agree: Books are no longer cool

                 ~ Posted by David W.

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“If it isn’t cuneiform, it just doesn’t speak to me.” Photo by flikr user M1K3Y

To many it came as a shock. Just as conventional wisdom chorused that in our increasingly plugged-in society print books were destined to get left behind, a series of studies and articles from such sources as Nielsen, Publishing TechnologyHewlett Packard, The Pew Research Center, and The Washington Post overwhelmingly agreed that not only was print as popular as ever, but that younger digital natives are some of its most devoted fans. But the very latest data suggests this is starting to change, as hip young readers are forsaking paper for the retro-cool of parchment, papyrus, clay and stone. “I guess we shouldn’t be surprised.” observed cultural commentator DuPrise Blevins of the Myrick Millennial Institute, “Once it became clear that books were still hot, kids just naturally try to top each other. So we had the incunabula craze, and illuminated monk-punk. Then papyrus scrolls were popping up everywhere, in malls and at the clubs. This year, it’s clay. Everything is clay.” Continue reading “Kids Agree: Books are no longer cool”

Books by People You’ve Probably Never Heard of, Part III

It’s hard out there for young writers. The only houses that will house them are small, indie enterprises full of energy but lacking funds, and readers are scared by untested virtue. Be scared no longer sovereign readers! I will test your books for poison. Eat up!

Richard Yates by Tao Lin

What’s in a name? Behind Tao Lin’s lies a deep undercurrent of electronic press and radical polarization of literary critique. Some people love him, others do not. Whatever the case, you have to applaud his productivity. The back of his latest book, Richard Yates, says it’s about an illicit affair between a highschooler and a college grad, her 16 to his 22. The relationship itself is “pretty normal” while the modes in which it is actualized portray the 21st century as the real criminal in the lineup for its lack of scope and human body interaction amidst its complex web of mobile communication. Continue reading “Books by People You’ve Probably Never Heard of, Part III”

Books By People You’ve Probably Never Heard Of, Part II

It’s hard out there for young writers. The only houses that will house them are small, indie enterprises full of energy but lacking funds, and readers are scared by untested virtue. Be scared no longer sovereign readers! I will test your books for poison. Eat up!

The Orange Eats Creeps by Grace Krilanovich

There is no future for the self-proclaimed Slutty Teenage Hobo Vampire Junkies. Our narrator and her band of undead boyfriends tour the Pacific Northwest as the most ostracized of rejects. Revolving along the spokes of 7-11 parking lots and meth-head-hiding old growths, our narrator tumble-dries through consciousness searching for an unrelated sister who may or may not already be buried.  Continue reading “Books By People You’ve Probably Never Heard Of, Part II”

Books by People You’ve Probably Never Heard of, Part I

It’s hard out there for young writers. The only houses that will house them are small, indie enterprises full of energy but lacking funds, and readers are scared by untested virtue. Be scared no longer sovereign readers! I will test your books for poison. Eat up!

The Really Funny Thing About Apathy by Chelsea Martin

Ms. Martin would probably hate me for saying she needs to tweak her math (yes, there is math in this book, though small, paradoxical and funny math). She would also probably hate me for calling her Ms., but what she would probably most likely not hate is that I loved her words. Chelsea Martin writes about not getting life. Her characters think about “It”, sure, they try to connect the dots and fill in the bubbles, but they never get it. In one short, “McDonalds Is Impossible”, Chelsea invents a new twist on Zeno’s Paradox Continue reading “Books by People You’ve Probably Never Heard of, Part I”