New Nonfiction Roundup – October 2018

October is a stellar month for nonfiction, with dozens of amazing titles to consider. Stay tuned for a separate post for the month’s best cookbooks.

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
10/2: All You Can Ever Know Nicole Chung searches for her birth parents in this examination of transracial adoption. A Peak Pick!
10/2: Always Look on the Bright Side of Life. Monty Python alum Eric Idle recounts his life in this “sortabiography.”
10/2: Full DisclosureStormy Daniels’s tell-all memoir about her career in adult films and interactions with Trump, and others.
10/2: Greatest Love Story Ever Told. . Find out if Nick Offerman & Megan Mullally are the funniest married couple in America.
10/2: The Ravenmaster. Meet Christopher Skaife, who protects ravens at the Tower of London. Continue reading “New Nonfiction Roundup – October 2018”

Reports on the Death of the Romantic Comedy are Greatly Exaggerated

For years, romantic comedies (rom coms) have been few and far between, and those that were released were often small budget indie films that were a hit with critics but did little at the box office. Then a little movie called Crazy Rich Asians came along…is it the beginning of a rom com renaissance?

While they weren’t blockbusters, there have been several rom coms over the past few years that have pleased both audiences and critics. While you wait for Crazy Rich Asians to come out on DVD,check out these three rom coms with diverse casts and storylines.

The Big Sick
Pakistani stand-up comic Kumail Nanjiani and grad student Zoe Kazan fall in love, but their relationship is complicated by Kumail’s Muslim parents and Zoe’s sudden illness. More romantic than funny, the film earned accolades for its realism and warmth, and the cross-cultural themes that added new dimensions to the rom com formula.

Continue reading “Reports on the Death of the Romantic Comedy are Greatly Exaggerated”

New Nonfiction Roundup – September 2018

What a month for nonfiction! Investigative reports on politics and sports, reflections on art and fashion, calls to arms from activists, historical assessments and books about books await you this September. Happy reading!

9/4: 21 Lessons for the 21st Century – Yuval Noah Harari. The author of Sapiens addresses the most urgent and complex issues we face today.

9/4: Big Game – Mark Leibovich. An immersive look at current state of the NFL.

9/4: Call Them By Their True Names – Rebecca Solnit. New essays from the feminist firebrand and author of Men Explain Things to Me

9/4: The Coddling of the American Mind – Greg Lukianoff. A controversial assessment of the climate on college campuses. Continue reading “New Nonfiction Roundup – September 2018”

Always Available Travel Guides

Seattleites love to travel (or at least love to read travel books). While the library has a large collection of travel books in print, they are not always available when you want them. OverDrive, our ebook provider, had a small collection with limited destinations.

Until now. Continue reading “Always Available Travel Guides”