Science Fiction Friday: Time Is On Your Side, Yes It Is

~Richard C.

My favorite part of the recent movie Interstellar (semi spoiler alert) was the character development when time started passing differently in the plot. Nothing terribly new about this in SF, but capturing the stark emotional realities of time in human space travel – this I found utterly moving (well, nearly exhausting after a 169 minute movie, plus previews). So this week we’re taking on the time and generational mission trope, and here are some gems to consider:

Clockwork RocketTHE CLOCKWORK ROCKET
Yalda lives in a universe distinctly unlike our own. Light operates differently, as do sexual reproduction, birth control, writing, and much much more. When Yalda’s world faces a mysterious and immediate threat from above, only a sufficiently fast ship can put time on Yalda’s side. Winner of the 1995 Campbell Memorial Award for his book Permutation City, Greg Egan puts the difficult in Hard SF, with even a few graphs and formulas throughout our text. Any lovers of physics, believers in more women in science, or fans of The Gods Themselves by Isaac Asimov – this book is for you. Continue reading “Science Fiction Friday: Time Is On Your Side, Yes It Is”

Science Fiction Fridays: The late, great Frederik Pohl

frederik pohlWe lost one of the giants of the field this week when science fiction writer/editor/Grand Master and science enthusiast Frederik Pohl passed away at the age of 93. It’s impossible to overstate the importance and influence that Pohl has had on science fiction, and thus literature as a whole, over the many decades he has been active. He started writing when he was still a teenager and continued writing right up until his death, publishing a novel a few years ago and regularly sharing his thoughts on various topics on his wonderful blog. Pohl practically invented science fiction with a few other Golden Age authors, but he was also quite at home with the New Wave science fiction writers of the 1970s. Continue reading “Science Fiction Fridays: The late, great Frederik Pohl”