Celebrate pollinators in June!

Learn more about pollinators, how to attract them into your garden, and reflect on what can be done to protect them and the work they do in our ecosystems. Of course it’s a subject always of interest, but June 17-23, 2019 is National Pollinator Week, designated by the U.S. Senate as a celebration of pollinators such as bees, butterflies, bats, and more. Here are some books and resources on bees and other pollinators.

Our Native Bees: North America’s Endangered Pollinators and the Fight to Save Them by Paige Embry
Organized by bee, Embry provides an overview of the various native bee species in the U.S, covering the nesting, foraging and mating habits of each bee. Embry visits the owners of almond groves, cherry orchards, blueberry fields and more to better understand different bees. Written in a chatty, folksy tone with many high-quality photos, this is a lovely book to dip in and out of. Continue reading “Celebrate pollinators in June!”

Birds, Bees, and Butterflies

The first Spring in our new house was spent figuring out where we wanted things and tackling the things we didn’t – I battled sticker bushes and morning glory, we moved garden beds, and got a patio poured. This year all that hard work started coming together. I planted vegetables, we got patio furniture, and got some flower beds organized – but like all good library nerds I had to do research first.

I’ve always wanted my yard to be habitat friendly so when I weeded I didn’t just take out everything that’s considered a weed. I kept clover and bachelor’s button despite their bad reputation. I also let things happen naturally with random plants that popped up on their own like lupine, hyacinths, daffodils, and a calla lilly! We added lavender, rosemary, borage, and mint for bees. I also, made little rain gardens and added bird feeders and from last year we have foxgloves and crocosmia for the hummingbirds.

I’ve seen so much new wildlife come into our yard lately; looking forward to what each year brings! Here are a few books in our collection that helped me out: Continue reading “Birds, Bees, and Butterflies”

Edible Garden Series: Coming soon to a library near you!

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The days are getting longer, choosing shoes in the morning is a low-stakes version of Russian roulette/exercise in futility (rain boots or strappy sandals?), the scent of cherry blossoms is in the air, and the first Pacific Northwest Halibut has shown up at Pike Place Market– all signs point to spring!  And what is spring in Seattle without gardening? Continue reading “Edible Garden Series: Coming soon to a library near you!”

Get Your Garden On!

 Now that the nice weather has started revving up, everyone I know is looking for excuses to be outside. When it comes to gardens, I’m of the plant-it-and-hope school, but if you’re ready for some hands-on advice to get started, or to further your skills, here are some inspiring books and local resources to check out!  Continue reading “Get Your Garden On!”

Why Rain Gardening might be right for you!

rain gardensMost people have heard the term ‘rain garden,’ but how many really know what that means?  Rain gardens are simply shallow depressions (6-12 inches deep) that gather and filter runoff from roofs and driveways when it rains.  Continue reading “Why Rain Gardening might be right for you!”