#BookBingoNW2018: Graphic novels for a blackout!

One solid Summer Book Bingo blackout strategy is to stockpile quickly-read comic books that could be applied to one of a number of different squares. This strategy gives you multiple choices of where to place a title when you need to fill a certain area of bingo card real estate. Plus you’ve got options if you need to move a title to a new square. The comics below are applicable to at least three squares on your bingo card. Of course any of these titles could instead apply to the graphic novel or recommended by a librarian square.

Your Black Friend and Other Strangers by Ben Passmore
Passmore has been producing funny, exceptional work for years, so it’s wonderful to see this collection of his comics essays, autobiography, fiction, and reportage. Don’t miss this short animation of the title story. Could apply to by an author of color; award-winning author; poetry or essays; memoir or biography; fiction. Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2018: Graphic novels for a blackout!”

#BookBingoNW2018: Graphic Novels

It’s summertime, which nowadays essentially means Marvel movies season! Not looking for more Captain America, Iron Man, Thor, or the Avengers? Then check out these lesser-known, but equally Marvel-ous graphic novels:

Black Bolt vol. 1 Hard Time by Saladin Ahmed & Christian Ward
Blackagar Boltagon (yes, really), the silent king of the Inhumans, finds himself imprisoned. Where is this prison? Who could be powerful enough to hold Black Bolt captive? This mesmerizing character study, with surreal, vibrant artwork, is part prison break, part buddy movie. Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2018: Graphic Novels”

Own Voices Comics

#ownvoices is a social media hashtag, first suggested on Twitter by Corinne Duyvis in September 2015 as a tool “to recommend kidlit about diverse characters written by authors from that same diverse group”. It is related to, and overlaps with, the “We Need Diverse Books” movement/non-profit organization. As a tool and a movement, #ownvoices can be used to describe any marginalized group within any genre of any art form; it is purposefully unrestrictive.

Try out these #ownvoices comics in The Seattle Public Library collection, where the creators (writer[s]) or artist[s]) share a marginalized identity with a protagonist:

The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye by Sonny Liew

The Eisner Award winning graphic novel from Singaporean-based Malaysian creator Sonny Liew tells the fictional story of Singaporean comics creator Charlie Chan Hock Chye, whose life and art parallel and evolve alongside the actual history of modern Singapore.

Continue reading “Own Voices Comics”

Kickstarter Comics at the Library

Generally comic book collections or original graphic novels are purchased by the Library from a book distributor. The titles offered by these companies typically include materials from major publishing companies. But many wonderful titles are produced by smaller presses or individuals, and funded through crowdsourcing sites such as Kickstarter. Many of these titles, after their initial Kickstarter printing, are picked up and reprinted by a larger publisher such as Boom! Studios or Image Comics.

The Library purchases materials from these publishers as a way to diversify the collection and support independent and oft-marginalized creators. Many of the stories told in these books unfortunately aren’t found at larger presses. Take a look at these recently crowd-funded comics and graphic novels in The Seattle Public Library collection, and Continue reading “Kickstarter Comics at the Library”

Comics are a Medium, Not a Genre

I hear it on occasion at the library, parents telling their children, comics in hand, “you need to choose a real book,” or, “I don’t want you only getting superhero stories.”  After the infamous campaign against reading comics in the middle of the 1950s by psychiatrist Fredric Wertham and the resulting self-censorship by the Comics Code Authority, the previously diverse storytelling platform of comics became dominated by the superhero stories of publishers DC and Marvel, and were considered by most an immature pastime. Continue reading “Comics are a Medium, Not a Genre”