Oh, doggone it!

Dogs can completely change the way we feel—for the better. They are funny, loving, and intelligent. Canine companions live in an estimated 63 million U.S. homes, so it’s no wonder stories, movies, and videos featuring dogs have always been big hits. Let’s not forget our own local legend, the public-transit-riding dog, Eclipse, who rides the bus throughout Seattle (except during quarantine, of course). Today, we are going to look at three dog-related titles that highlight the amazing lives of dogs and those who live with, rely on, and love them.

The Art of Racing in the Rain book cover imageThe Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein

This is one of those stories, told through the eyes (and voice) of a dog, that simply works. Enzo is a dog who sees the world for what it is and would love to speak his mind directly to those around him, but cannot. However, we are lucky enough to get an inside look at his joys and frustrations surrounding the life of his human family. Publisher’s Weekly notes: “Stein’s tale of family, loss, redemption, and fast cars—recounted entirely from the perspective of a retriever-terrier mix named Enzo—ups the ante on the recent trend of high-concept anthropomorphism in popular fictions.” Continue reading “Oh, doggone it!”

Award Winning Comics for Your Bucket List 

A Bucket List is a number of experiences or achievements that a person hopes to have or accomplish during their lifetime. This can take many forms, but for many lovers of the written word this comes more often in must read books. Here are award winning comics that are a must read for any one wanting a taste of the best!

The Sandman – Neil Gaiman

One of the first few graphic novels to ever be on the New York Times Best Seller list, Neil Gaiman (Yes, that Neil Gaiman of American Gods and Good Omens) penned this epic dark fantasy with an intriguing blend of history and mythology, all through the eyes of the Master of Dreams gazing into the human world. And much like recalling a dream or a nightmare, a few mere sentences cannot describe the scope of wonder and horror this comic has in store. (Did I happen to mention Neil Gaiman wrote this?) Continue reading “Award Winning Comics for Your Bucket List “

Original Independent: John Sayles

Filmmaker and author John Sayles has been creating excellent work for over forty years. Helming his first film in 1980 at the age of 30, he had already written two books and a few genre films for Roger Corman, including the timeless eco-parables Piranha and Alligator. Favoring stories about communities during moments of upheaval and duress, Sayles’s brand of social consciousness is present across his work, often marked by ensemble casts that occupy various strata of economic power. Through Overdrive and Hoopla, you can explore a sample of this great storyteller’s work with your Seattle Public Library card.

Available as both an ebook and a downloadable audiobook is his latest novel, Yellow Earth. Following over a dozen players around the Dakotan region of the town of Yellow Earth, the book explores the evolution of a community affected by the discovery of oil in its vicinity. The story dives headlong into fracking dynamics, exploring the geological and psychological fallout of corporate mandates in a world that is still addicted to petroleum. Continue reading “Original Independent: John Sayles”

Horrorfest on Kanopy

For those of us finding ourselves spending extra time with housemates or family, horror movie marathons are an excellent way to pass the days. If you’ve exhausted the movie options on your go-to streaming subscription service, Kanopy has an incredible selection of films that are free to access with your library card. Here are a few diverse and international scary films all released within the last 10 years that you can start watching tonight! (Important note: most of these films are only appropriate for adults; please use discretion if watching with younger family members.)

Florence Pugh makes up her mind in Midsommar

If you missed Midsommar when it came out in theaters last summer, now is a perfect time to catch up – for free! This film shows what happens when a small group of American graduate students travel to Sweden for an obscure (and chilling) midsummer festival, inverting traditional horror tropes as the entire plot unravels during the bright light of day. Continue reading “Horrorfest on Kanopy”

Missing the Library? Us, Too…

There’s a good chance you are longing for the days when you could simply walk into the library to pick up a book, watch a DVD, browse the internet or peruse the rest of the endless available services and materials. You’re not alone! So, in the spirit of the library being closed but many services still being accessible, we bring you a list to immerse you back into the wondrous world of libraries (and all things associated with)!

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The Library: A Catalogue of Wonders by Stuart Kells

If you have ever had any inclination to learn about libraries, their history, and what they mean to those around the world then Kell’s book will be a great introduction into the world of a bibliophile. From Kirkus Reviews: “More miscellany than catalog, the book assembles snippets from a wide variety of disciplines into an eclectic history of libraries as cultural, political, aesthetic, literary, mnemonic, and, above all, personal phenomena dedicated to collecting and preserving the written word.” Continue reading “Missing the Library? Us, Too…”