#BookBingoNW2021 Made You Laugh

Summer Book Bingo has officially launched, so let’s get reading! With so many great categories to work with, The Seattle Public Library staff would love to help you find your perfect match.

You are in no short supply of hilarious books for the Made You Laugh category. Safe bets include the various works of David Sedaris, the essays Sloane Crosley and even the scientific oddities Mary Roach explores, but here are some more newly released titles that may be of interest to you.

You’ll Never Believe What Happened To Lacey: Crazy Stories About Racism, written by siblings Amber Ruffin and Lacey Lamar, does something few books can: it makes you laugh and think while bringing up cringe-worthy events. The genius of these sisters is that they talk about their experiences with racism through their anecdotes and conversational writing, differentiated with fonts. If a book can be both hilarious and horrifying, then this is it. You may know Amber Ruffin from her work on Late Night with Seth Meyers.

Casey McQuiston’s hilarious romantic comedy One Last Stop picks right up where they left off in terms of pop-cultural references, crazy mix-ups, first loves and laugh-out-loud narration. We find August, a cynical twenty-three year old working at an all-night diner. August really isn’t impressed by much and she definitely isn’t a believer. Then she meets Jane on a subway and something is different; very different – like time-displaced different. What ensues will make you laugh and hopefully end up believing in the impossible. It is great follow up to their debut novel Red, White & Royal Blue.

For the audiophiles out there, finding a great narrator can be a challenge sometimes, but the Made You Laugh category gives you an opportunity to hear hilarious stories told in the author’s own voice. Ali Wong’s Dear Girls: Intimate Tales, Untold Secrets, & Advice for Living Your Best Life is a perfect example of this. In a series of letters (chapters), Ali gives life advice to her daughters, candidly and honestly. If you are familiar with her stand up, this books is right up there, so beware the potty humor.

Wow, No Thank You by Samantha Irby was a finalist for the 2021 Audies award for Humor. (Not familiar with the Audies? They are pretty much the Oscars but for audiobooks.) Samantha’s newest collection of short stories includes stories that are often very self-deprecating and often relatable. She tells it like it is, whether it is about her slowly aging or about settling down, while using brutally honest humor to tell her hilarious stories. She does not hold back, which is the best thing about her.

Finally, be sure to check out Broken (in the Best Possible Way) by Jenny Lawson. While this book describes her struggle with depression and anxiety (something already known to her fans), Jenny takes us on a journey through her experiences with heartbreaking and often devastatingly funny anecdotes, like the time she was attacked by bears or the reason why she can no longer go to the Post Office. She is not afraid to laugh at herself, and we are helpless not to laugh along.

If you haven’t yet, you can download your Bingo card and find some of our curated lists and related articles at our Book Bingo page, and find our Spanish-language Bingo card and lists here! Still looking for ideas? Don’t forget you can ask for a personalized reading list from Your Next 5 Books! Book bingo is presented in partnership with Seattle Arts & Lectures.

Three smart, witty authors you want to read

I’m pretty sure you all know that David Sedaris has a new book, Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls. Maybe you’re even one of the 1,095 people on the waiting lists for our 217 copies (that’s five different formats: print, large print, CD, eaudio and ebook). But there are some other writers out there who are funny. And this month* is the perfect time to get to know these three a little better: Continue reading “Three smart, witty authors you want to read”

Silly Stories to Share

I don’t know about you, but despite the glorious weather, everyone I know is in need of a bit of cheering up.  I turn once more to the picture books, the silly and the sublime.

Waiting For Winter by Sebastien Meschenmoser
I know we’re all waiting for summer at this point, but don’t let that stop you from picking up this lovely, hilarious book. Some of the most expressive drawings I’ve ever seen, combined with an original story and a smart, subtle commentary on the state of our world. Really, though, just get it for the pictures. No one, but no one, has ever captured such an exquisitely sleepy squirrel or such a fabulously unkempt hedgehog. They’re just _so_tired. I can relate.

Hippo! No, Rhino! by Jeff Newman
Read this one aloud. Giving voice to the grumpy, grumpy hippo RHINO is immensely satisfying. The simple illustrations nevertheless convey our hapless hippo’s RHINO’s distress excellently and with feeling. There are days when I long to correct opinions forcibly with the strength of my vehemence alone. I could take lessons from the much maligned and very funny RHINO.

Monkey With a Tool Belt by Chris Monroe
“This is Chico Bon Bon.” Of course it is. If I were a monkey with a tool belt (and a banana hammer), my name would have to be Chico Bon Bon, too. And I would have lots of absurd adventures involving excessive tinkering and unnecessarily complicated escape plans and loud noises like “Arooga Boom Clang Clang Clang!” Oh, wait. That last one’s from the next book, Monkey with a Tool Belt and the Noisy Problem . Trust me, you’ll want to read that one, too.

Happy by Mies van Hout
This new book, written for the very young, makes up in extraordinary, luminous chalk drawings what it lacks in plot. Brightly colored fish portray a range of emotion from the simple joy of delight, to the spikey intensity of fury. Beautiful and satisfying.

Mad at Mommy by Komako Sakai
Again with the expressive illustrations! Komako Sakai won awards for one of her other books, The Snow Day, but Mad at Mommy talks to me in the place where my inner child having a tantrum lives. Her engaging, delightful book provides a space to thoroughly enjoy being dramatically upset without collapsing in a heap yourself.

~Jenny, Central Library