Intriguing Latin American Fiction

Only about three percent of all books published in the United States are works in translation, and many of those books don’t necessarily garner a lot of mainstream press. As part of our ongoing series highlighting intriguing international fiction, here is a glimpse of some recent, interesting novels from Latin American authors.

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Intriguing African Fiction, 2016

Sitting down to write about international fiction can be overwhelming simply because there is so much good stuff available, and any entry will inevitably leave so much out. Consider this a glimpse of interesting novels coming from outside our borders – in this case, coming from authors in countries throughout Africa.

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Nigeria’s literary scene is booming. Blackass by A. Igoni Barrett is satire in which a young Nigerian man wakes up white – except for his ass – and sets off into Lagos to go job hunting. Born on a Tuesday by Elnathan John is a coming-of-age novel set in Northern Nigeria, as Dantala grows up surrounded by extremism and violence yet finds his way forward through faith. And After Many Days by Jowhor Ile is set on the Nigerian coast in 1995. A teenage boy goes missing, his disappearance ripping through his family as his younger brother searches for him and instead finds family secrets. Continue reading “Intriguing African Fiction, 2016”

Rio Reads

Today begins the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Watching televised coverage of the Games, you will surely see glimpses of life in Rio in the background. If you want to round out your sports viewing with a more robust and nuanced view of life in Rio and in the rest of Brazil, here are some books and authors to pique your interest. (You’ll find even more on this list).

Novels set in Brazil

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Hey, our pick for the Dublin Literary Award made the shortlist!

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Do you follow the International Dublin Literary Awards? Here’s why you should:

  1. Public libraries around the world nominate books for the award, and you love public libraries.
  2. A healthy mix of U.S. and international novels make both the longlist and the shortlist, and you’ve been looking for suggestions for some of the best international fiction.
  3. It’s one of the richest literary prizes, with 100,000 euros (approximately $112,000) going to the winner, and you like it when great writing is rewarded.
  4. One of this year’s 10 finalists was nominated by your own library (that’s us! Seattle Public Library!).

Continue reading “Hey, our pick for the Dublin Literary Award made the shortlist!”