Bus Reads for November

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in November:

There Therebook cover image of There There by Tommy Orange. It was one of those books I loved, but wanted more. I want more book, I want a sequel, I want more of the story, more, more, more, but it was beautiful and tragic and a needed voice. This story centers around the Oakland powwow that takes place at the end of the novel, those who are a part of it, those who want to be a part of it, and those that bring in harm. You have multiple character perspectives and as you read you start to see the connections being made. This book had brilliance and poetry in its commentary on the lives of urban Indians. The author also brings in history and stereotype and blows everything wide open. Continue reading “Bus Reads for November”

Practice Gratitude

We live in a pretty fast paced world, one that can cloud our gratefulness for what we have, what we’ve been given, and those we share our lives with. I challenge you to take the time (and not just in November) to practice gratitude.

Focus on areas of your life you can be more grateful for like your home, your partner, or just time to be with yourself and disconnect:

Learn to engage in positive self-talk. Too often we beat ourselves down when we should be lifting ourselves up:

Continue reading “Practice Gratitude”

Bus Reads for October

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in October:

Our Homesick Songs by Emma Hooper. A small fishing island in Newfoundland is home to few. As the fish began to vanish, so too did the island’s inhabitants, leaving one by one to seek a life elsewhere. This is the story of two generations of Connors and those that refuse to leave the only home they’ve ever known. Aiden and Martha take turns working on the main land to support their children Cora and Finn. Finn has a plan to bring the fish back and Cora, after decorating every abandoned home to look like far away lands, makes a plan herself. Aiden and Martha’s stories are also told in flashback chapters connecting it all. A beautiful novel of family and hope. Continue reading “Bus Reads for October”

Bus Reads for September

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in September:

The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore by Kim Fu: Five girls, Nita, Isabel, Andee, Siobhan, and Dina are selected by their camp leader, Jan, to go on a kayaking trip. These girls already have established friendships and rivalries that shape how they will fend for themselves after their camp leader meets a tragic fate. The narration goes from girl to girl as well and includes flashbacks of camp life before, during, and after the incident. It was thrilling, almost edge of your seat read at times, but also the story of these girls as adults; it was interesting to see how one moment can have an impact on the rest of your life. Continue reading “Bus Reads for September”