The Other Boleyn Girl

boleyngirl1.jpgI’m a sucker for Tudor tales, so you can bet I’m excited that Philippa Gregory’s wonderful novel, The Other Boleyn Girl, is coming to the big screen this coming weekend (opens on February 29). I’ve certainly read a lot about Anne Boleyn over the years, but Mary Boleyn? This piece of historical fiction was new to me. And, oh, what scandal and intrigue ensue when Anne and Mary (and their brother, George) arrive at King Henry VIII’s court! Was Mary, who was already married to one of Henry’s courtiers, really the favored sister? What scheming took place to make sure that the Howard family rose to power above the Seymours? The book is a fast-paced almost racy read, and certainly worth reading before you see the movie (starring Natalie Portman and Scarlett Johansson; my excitement knows no bounds!).

What to read next, to keep the Tudor fires burning? There’s certainly no shortage in historical fiction for this slice of history, but if you liked The Other Boleyn Girl, try these two by the same author: The Constant Princess (follows the life of Katherine of Aragon, the first wife of Henry VIII) and The Boleyn Inheritance (lady-in-waiting Jane Boleyn testifies against Anne of Cleves, while her family works to place Katherine Howard on the throne). Or perhaps you, like me, have a bit of a Lady Jane Grey obsession going that started way back in elementary school? Then you won’t want to miss Innocent Traitor, the first novel by respected biographer Alison Weir. It’s a bit meatier than The Other Boleyn Girl, but just as engrossing.

Let’s hear about some other Tudor novels you’ve read …

Books that inspire the best book group discussions

danish-girl.jpgMy book group recently had a discussion of the books that led to our best –- and most memorable –- discussions ever. It was nice not only to reflect on the many books we’ve read and discussed together, but also look at what makes a “good book club book.” About five or six titles stood out, most notably The Danish Girl by David Ebershoff, a novel that would be a nice companion with Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides (another one of our favorites). Two other all-time favorites happen to be part of Seattle Reads: The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri and Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi. (My book club friends will be quick to point out that we read these before they were selected by Seattle Reads. And we read Middlesex before Oprah discovered it. We like to point out things like that.) A Very Long Engagement by Sebastien Japrisot and The Awakening by Kate Chopin are two we keep going back to. Memorable evenings together Continue reading “Books that inspire the best book group discussions”