New Magazine Subscriptions: Part 2

In last month’s New Magazine Subscription: Part 1 we explored some fresh new titles hitting our magazine shelves, covering everything from dogs to military history. An eclectic mix of new titles keep coming! Here are several more subscriptions that have recently started at the Central Library and at branches.

Fantastic Man One of few men’s fashion magazines, Fantastic Man presents striking photography alongside interviews with influential men around the world. The Spring/Summer 2017 issue features film director Steve McQueen, photographer Collier Schorr, writer Édouard Louis, comedian Gad Elmaleh, actor Woody Harrelson, restauranteur Jeremy King, and photographer Tom Bianchi. If that’s not enough, you’ll find plenty of style inspiration (like these camping-inspired outfits).

Huck  I didn’t realize how much I was craving something a little different in my reading routine until I discovered Huck. With a mission to challenge and defy dominant narratives, Huck’s global journalists explore counterculture and subcultures left relatively untouched by other media. Take a look at the March/April 2017 issue for articles about an all-female London motorcycle collective, El Salvador graffiti, progressive porn, and the music of South Sudan’s youth. Also available at the Capitol Hill Branch. Continue reading “New Magazine Subscriptions: Part 2”

New Magazine Subscriptions: Part 1

We are excited to announce the start of several new print magazines subscriptions at the Central Library and at many branches! Thank you to all the patrons and staff who made suggestions over the last two years. You have helped our magazine collection remain current and a reflection of the many interests of our community. Here are some of Central Library’s most recent additions, with more to come in the near future:

City Dog Seattle famously contains more dogs than children, so it’s no wonder that our city also offers an excellent magazine for the pooch-loving city dweller. If that’s you, City Dog is an excellent local source for information on training, socialization, gear, wellness, and a variety of dog-related local events.

Continue reading “New Magazine Subscriptions: Part 1”

Nightstand Reads: Seattle author Sharon H. Chang shares from her bookpile(s)

Our guest blogger today is Sharon H. Chang, author of Raising Mixed Race: Multiracial Asian Children in a Post-Racial World. Sharon H. Chang is a writer, scholar and activist who focuses on racism, social justice and the Asian American diaspora with a feminist lens. She serves as a consultant for Families of Color Seattle and is on the planning committee for the Critical Mixed Race Studies Conference. Join us for her book talk, along with local mixed-race guest speakers and performers, on Thursday, September 29 at 7 p.m. at the Central Library.

Dear Readers,raising-mixed-race

First. Truth. I’ve got books on my nightstand but I don’t read at night. I mostly read in the early, early morning before the sun comes up; when the air outside is quiet, still and fresh; when cars are parked, the hustle bustle of the day hasn’t begun and most people are still sound asleep; most importantly my six-year-old son is still sound asleep. And I keep books all over the house. On my nightstand yes. But also on shelves, counters, in book bags, unopened and opened boxes, upstairs and downstairs, half-read, read twice, never read, will read later, reading now. In my head I have a rule “one book at a time, finish first then the next.” But in reality that never works out. There is – to simply put the simple truth – just too much exciting stuff to read and not always the perfect time to read it in.

So what’s in my for-the-morning nightstand/all-over-the-house piles right now? Continue reading “Nightstand Reads: Seattle author Sharon H. Chang shares from her bookpile(s)”

Nightstand Reads: Bob Wyss

Robert WyssBob Wyss is associate professor of journalism at the University of Connecticut and a journalist who has written for the New York Times, Christian Science Monitor, Boston Globe, Smithsonian, Providence Journal and Yankee. His most recent work is the 2016 book, The Man Who Built the Sierra Club: A Life of David Brower. He will read excerpts from the book and discuss his research on Tuesday, August 2, at 7 p.m. at the Central Library. We are exciting to have him here today as our guest blogger, with several suggestions for books about the environment. Continue reading “Nightstand Reads: Bob Wyss”

Long May You Run

Photograph courtesy of Rosemary Washington.

If the Solstice Parade and Pride festivities have you all worn out and you’re planning to take it easy next weekend, come on over to the Greenwood Car Show! Take a leisurely stroll down Greenwood Ave N. on Saturday, June 30th, where you’ll be able to drool over 1.5 miles of hot rods, collector cars, antique gems and modern masterpieces. While you’re there, swing by the Greenwood Library on 81st  and Greenwood Ave N., where we’ll be stocked up on car books and movies for all ages!

You can also get a head start by requesting some of these fun films today:

Photograph courtesy of Rosemary Washington.

Nothing says summer like a good old-fashioned car chase movie. The French Connection includes one of the most iconic car chases in film history, where a 1971 Pontiac Le Mans pursues an elevated train through Brooklyn. Or maybe it’s time to revisit Bullitt, in which Steve McQueen roars through the hills of San Francisco in a 1968 Ford Mustang, sealing his place as one of the coolest guys in film history. If you’re wondering where all the women are, look no further than Death Proof. One and a half hours of Quentin Tarantino’s trademark snappy dialogue concludes with one of the most thrilling and satisfying car chases ever. Honorable mention goes to the The Italian Job (1969), a silly British caper film involving three Mini Coopers. Compared to Mustangs and Pontiacs, these little cars are just so darn cute. Plus, they can weave through the buildings (and pipes!) of Turin like no other car can.

If one too many car chases has desensitized you to that kind of thrill, get your heart racing with a horror movie.  A product of Stephen King’s and John Carpenter’s sick imaginations, Christine is the love story of a teenager and his demonically possessed – and extremely possessive – 1958 Plymouth Fury. This unstoppable car from hell stops at nothing to make sure that no one gets between her and her man. Not scared yet? Try Duel, in which a mysterious tanker truck relentlessly stalks a single unlucky motorist down a remote road. The omnipresence of the tanker leaves little time to figure out WHY this is happening, and ultimately it is this lack of any kind of explanation that makes the pursuit so horrifying.

If you’re looking for less mayhem and more family-friendly viewing, try The Love Bug, which follows the adventures of Herbie, a VW Beetle who loves to race. And if you fall in love with this funny little car, there are several more Herbie movies to enjoy! The 60’s also produced such gems as Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and The Absent-minded Professor, both of which involve offbeat gentlemen adapting their vehicles to do magical things. (Of course, if that’s what you’re looking for you could just watch Back to the Future for the millionth time). Sure, these aren’t as flashy as Speed Racer or Cars, but they’ll give you an evening of wholesome family fun nonetheless.

A wise man once said “cars are the dinosaurs of tomorrow,” and despite their powers to destroy all of mankind, both are still pretty cool. So snuggle up with a bowl of Orville Redenbacher and hunker down with a classic car or two.

See you at the Greenwood Car Show!