City Council Reads – Rob Johnson, District 4

This past November, Seattle swore in a new Mayor and City Councilmember, and we here at ShelfTalk thought this would be a great opportunity to continue our series of posts in which we invited your representatives to share books that have meant a lot to them. This time, we asked them “What book was most influential in your life or career and why?” This week, Councilmember Rob Johnson, representing District 4, Northeast Seattle.

“What book was most influential in your life or career and why?”

The Color of Law by Richard Rothstein made a huge impact on me, and continues to shape my work as I serve as the chair of the Seattle City Council’s Planning, Land Use & Zoning committee. This book represents a powerful examination of the way 20th century land use and zoning policy in America deepened the harmful divide of segregation, Continue reading “City Council Reads – Rob Johnson, District 4”

Intiman’s Dragon Lady and Philippine Migration

The migration of a family from the Philippines to America has been explored in colorful form by Sara Porkalob in Dragon Lady, a one woman show at the Intiman Theater, closing October 1st. She revisits the arc of Philippine culture and assimilation from her grandmother’s time to her own, as she portrays three generations of her family members. Along the way she dramatizes the themes of stereotyping, resiliency, sexual exploitation, gangster feuds, teen pregnancy, and single parenting, through the lives and eyes of Filipinos on the islands, and as immigrants of color in America. (Check out this brief interview with the title character of Sara Porkalob’s Dragon Lady. Porkalob will also be reading from a banned book at the Library’s panel on Intellectual Freedom and Libraries this coming October 4 at 7 p.m.). Continue reading “Intiman’s Dragon Lady and Philippine Migration”

20 Essential Seattle Books, Part 3: Place

Next in our ongoing series of 20 books that capture the essence of Seattle, we look at a variety of titles that capture a sense of our city and its environs. Whether you’re new in town, just passing through, or you’ve lived here all your life, these titles will enhance your awareness of and appreciation for the misty charms of this city on the Sound.

cliff-massThe bluest skies that you’ll ever see are in Seattle, unless of course they’re hidden by fifty shades of grey. While less extreme than many other areas of the country, our soggy maritime weather has always been a big part of our identity and outlook: not for nothing are Puget Sound natives called “mossbacks.” Given that weather forms a lion’s share of our small talk, reading Weather of the Pacific Northwest, by local climate celebrity Cliff Mass will up your game when it comes to discussing convergence zones, onshore flow, and our Seattle specialty, the “occasional sunbreak.”

tim-eganMeteorology not your thing? Check out Tim Egan’s 1990 The Good Rain: Across Time and Terrain in the Pacific Northwest for a more personal and evocative exploration of the beauty and fragility of the Northwest landscape. In vivid prose Egan etches the water-shaped, forested home looking back over a century into the past, and presciently forward to the increasing sprawl, clearcutting and traffic of the past twenty-five years. (For more particular approaches to our environs, check out Richard Morril and Michael Brown’s Seattle Geographies, David Williams’ Too High and Too Steep: Reshaping Seattle’s Topography, and Matthew Kringle’s Emerald City: An Environmental History of Seattle. Or for a disturbing look at what simmers beneath our city’s surface, locals are well advised to check out Sandi Doughton’s Full Rip 9.0: The Next Big Earthquake in the Pacific Northwest. (Long story short: have your emergency plans ready.)  Continue reading “20 Essential Seattle Books, Part 3: Place”

South West Stories: Ken Workman

“This we know; The earth does not belong to man; man belongs to the earth.  This we know, all things are connected like the blood which unites one family.  All things are connected”

–Chief Si’ahl, Namesake of the City of Seattle

On Sunday, Aug 21, 2 p.m., Delridge Library hosts Ken Workman, member of Duwamish Tribal Council, and great-great-great-great grandson of Chief Seattle. This event is part of the South West Stories monthly series presenting the history of West Seattle, the Duwamish Peninsula and the Birthplace of Seattle – in collaboration with Southwest Seattle Historical Society. Continue reading “South West Stories: Ken Workman”

Seattle’s Presidential Visits of the Past

-posted by Jade D.

In honor of Presidents’ Day, we took a look through our digital collections to find mentions of some of Seattle’s earliest presidential visits. We’ve highlighted the first five below – take a look!

October 11, 1880 marked the date of the first president to visit Seattle with the arrival of Rutherford B. Hayes. Hayes was not only the first president to visit Seattle but also the first to make it to the western territories during his tenure. He arrived at Yesler wharf on the George E. Starr steamer and made brief trips via train to Newcastle and Renton before returning to Seattle for an evening of celebrations. Continue reading “Seattle’s Presidential Visits of the Past”