Stay Home, Stay Healthy. Stay Sane with the Library.

March 13th, 2020 was notable for two reasons. One, it was Friday the 13th, but hardly anyone at the Seattle Public Library noticed for the second reason: it was the last day we were open before closing our doors for a month because of COVID-19. It was a frantic and stressful day full of uncertainty for everyone, with an outstanding outcome: on a typical Friday, SPL checks out 13,000 physical items, but on March 13th we checked out 104,000 books, DVDs and CDs! 

Southwest Library, Friday March 13, 1 p.m.

While patrons are unable to borrow any physical items until at least April 13, SPL has a rich and robust collection of digital resources that can be accessed anytime. Patrons new to digital resources will find lots to choose from, and experienced patrons will find new items to discover.

OverDrive has a large collection of popular eBooks and eAudiobooks, many with holds queues. Avoid the wait with our Always Available Audiobook collection, dream of a world beyond your home with 75 Lonely Planet Travel guides, dig into that classic you’ve been meaning to read with the Duke Classics series, or check out the Big Library Read, Funny, You Don’t Look Autistic by Michael McCreary. Continue reading “Stay Home, Stay Healthy. Stay Sane with the Library.”

St. Patrick’s Day and Chill

This St. Patrick’s Day we may find ourselves hunkering down with a movie and drinking at home. That made me think of some of my favorite films over the years that I’ve watched around this time of year.

My absolute favorite when I was a kid was Darby O’Gill and the Little People. My godmother was obsessed with Sean Connery, I mean who wasn’t, but my favorite part was the romance and, of course, I can still sing that song by heart…you know the song right? Pretty Irish Girl.

Oh, she is my dear
my darlin’ one
Her eyes so sparklin’
full of fun

No other, no other
can match the likes of her

Continue reading “St. Patrick’s Day and Chill”

2020 Adaptations: From Book to Screen

Books are increasingly becoming Hollywood’s most treasured manna–the star-stuff that inspires the year’s buzziest television films and movies. Here are some books and series coming to screens big and small this year:

Let’s start with adaptations with Northwest ties!

Continue reading “2020 Adaptations: From Book to Screen”

Books Coming to the Big Screen in 2019

Two quintessential Seattle novels — Where’d You Go, Bernadette and The Art of Racing in the Rain — are coming to a movie theatre near you in 2019! Some scenes for Bernadette were filmed at our Central Library (and, yes, Cate Blanchette was there, AT OUR LIBRARY!). We can’t wait to see if we made the final cut.

Many other books have been adapted for the screen and will make their debut in 2019, and we’ve listed 10 here with links to the books that inspired them. Time to read and re-read some of these treasures:

The Rhythm Section (opening Feb. 22)
The Book: The Rhythm Section by Mark Burnell.
College student Stephanie Patrick’s life is destroyed after the crash of flight NEO027; her family was on board and there were no survivors. She spins out of control until a reporter discovers the crash was not an accident and Stephanie finds a new focus: revenge.
The Film: Directed by Reed Morano; stars Blake Lively, Jude Law. Continue reading “Books Coming to the Big Screen in 2019”

Reports on the Death of the Romantic Comedy are Greatly Exaggerated

For years, romantic comedies (rom coms) have been few and far between, and those that were released were often small budget indie films that were a hit with critics but did little at the box office. Then a little movie called Crazy Rich Asians came along…is it the beginning of a rom com renaissance?

While they weren’t blockbusters, there have been several rom coms over the past few years that have pleased both audiences and critics. While you wait for Crazy Rich Asians to come out on DVD,check out these three rom coms with diverse casts and storylines.

The Big Sick
Pakistani stand-up comic Kumail Nanjiani and grad student Zoe Kazan fall in love, but their relationship is complicated by Kumail’s Muslim parents and Zoe’s sudden illness. More romantic than funny, the film earned accolades for its realism and warmth, and the cross-cultural themes that added new dimensions to the rom com formula.

Continue reading “Reports on the Death of the Romantic Comedy are Greatly Exaggerated”