New Nonfiction Roundup – February 2020

The shortest month of the year is filled with page-turning narrative nonfiction, new perspectives on history, revealing memoirs and politics, politics, politics. Happy reading!

Peak Picks.
Floret Farm’s a Year in Flowers celebrates the beauty of flower arranging from Washington’s family farm of the same name. Poet Cathy Hong Park unpacks the complexities of Asian American identity in Minor FeelingsAnd advice columnist Daniel Mallory Ortberg merges literary essays with memoir about his transgender journey in Something That May Shock & Discredit You.

Politics.
Craig Fehrman explores the lives of presidents through their own books in Author in Chief while Ben Cohen chronicles the highest court’s rightward swing in Supreme Inequality. Washington Post columnist EJ Dionne gives progressives and moderates hope this election year in Code Red and former Obama adviser Dan Pfeiffer offers Democrats a playbook to win in 2020 in Untrumping America. New York Times columnist Ross Douthat offers prescriptions for what ails us in The Decadent SocietyIn Dark Towers, David Enrich exposes the links between Deutsche Bank and Donald Trump, and Jill Wine-Banks looks back at her role as a special prosecutor during Nixon’s obstruction of justice trial in Watergate Girl. Continue reading “New Nonfiction Roundup – February 2020”

New Nonfiction Roundup – October 2019

PEAK PICKS.
Two  memoirs from titans in the music industry join Peak Picks this “Rocktober”: The Beautiful Ones by Prince and Me by Elton John. Bill Bryson’s latest, a guide to The Body and comedian Ali Wong’s first book,  Dear Girls, will delight readers, while Rachel Maddow will infuriate news junkies with an expose on Big Oil in Blowout. Seattleite Timothy Egan embarks on A Pilgrimage to Eternity along the Via Francigena, and David Workman and Suquamish Tribe chairman Leonard Forsman honor the Salish Sea in We Are Puget Sound Continue reading “New Nonfiction Roundup – October 2019”

New Nonfiction Roundup – August 2019

Three memoirs from adult children about a parent. Three books to challenge white readers about race. Two titles examine what works, and what doesn’t, in educating our children. And a quirky new guide to Seattle. All are coming your way this August!

America is Better Than ThisOregon Senator Jeff Merkley’s manifesto against Trump’s war on migrant families is a timely polemic.

Eat More PlantsDesiree Nielsen presents more than 100 plant-based, anti-inflammatory recipes for optimal health. Continue reading “New Nonfiction Roundup – August 2019”

New Nonfiction Roundup – July 2019

What’s new in nonfiction this July? Page-turning chronicles of crises close to home and abroad, women stepping out of the shadow of men, and a pair of graphic adaptations highlight the best this month has to offer.

Amazing DecisionsA graphic guide to making better decisions, from Dan Ariely (Predictably Irrational). 

America’s Reluctant PrinceHistorian Steven M. Gillon looks at the life and legacy of John F. Kennedy Jr.

American PredatorMaureen Callahan delivers a gripping true crime tale of serial killer Israel Keyes. Continue reading “New Nonfiction Roundup – July 2019”

New Nonfiction Roundup – June 2019

100 Side HustlesChris Guillebeau features 100 stories of regular people launching successful side businesses.

Broken Places & Outer SpacesNnedi Okorafor examines how limitation and hardship in the lives of artists fuel their work.

Cult of the Dead Cow. Explores how one of the first group of hackers came to lead the charge for cyber security from Joseph Menn.

Definitely Hispanic. A collection of comedic and introspective essays by social media influencer Lejuan James about growing up Hispanic in the US.

Dignity. Photographer Chris Arnade presents portraits of America’s poor, drug-addicted, and forgotten, both urban and rural, blue state and red state. Continue reading “New Nonfiction Roundup – June 2019”