Nightstand Reads: Author Will Taylor Shares Some Favorite Middle Grade Books

We’re delighted to have Seattle author Will Taylor, whose debut middle grade novel Maggie & Abby’s Neverending Pillow Fort came out last month, here to share with young readers and parents five novels he can’t wait for you all to read. But first, let us tell you a bit more about his novel: 

Maggie & Abby’s Neverending Pillow Fort is “a rollicking good time” says Booklist (confirmed!) and “Ridiculously irresistible,” according to Kirkus Reviews (also confirmed). In this first book in a series, Maggie has eagerly waited for her best friend Abby to get home from Camp Cantaloupe, only to find that all Abby wants to talk about is camp things. When Maggie discovers that a pillow in the back of her fort mysteriously leads into the one Abby built, the two friends are just an arm’s length away — and set for adventure. Continue reading “Nightstand Reads: Author Will Taylor Shares Some Favorite Middle Grade Books”

Nightstand Reads: Seattle author Kim Fu shares recent favorites

Our guest blogger today is Kim Fu, author of the forthcoming novel The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore, in which a group of young girls descend on Camp Forevermore, a sleepaway camp in the Pacific Northwest, where their days are filled with swimming lessons, friendship bracelets, and camp songs by the fire. Filled with excitement and nervous energy, they set off on an overnight kayaking trip to a nearby island. But before the night is over, they find themselves stranded, with no adults to help them survive or guide them home. The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore traces these five girls—Nita, Andee, Isabel, Dina, and Siobhan—through and beyond this fateful trip. Fu will be appearing at Elliott Bay Book Co. at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 13.

I’ve kept a list of every book I’ve read since 2010. It’s been interesting to see patterns that align with events in my personal life: interests that crop up and fade, what and how much I read in a year of mourning versus a year of celebration. Like many people, I also discovered that what I thought of as my own capricious, wide-ranging taste was instead reflective of what books get published and hyped in a particular year, and that I needed to make a conscious effort to read more diversely. I was especially inspired by this list by R.O. Kwon, Continue reading “Nightstand Reads: Seattle author Kim Fu shares recent favorites”

Nightstand Reads: Jane Wong

Our guest blogger today is Seattle poet Jane Wong, visiting Assistant Professor at Pacific Lutheran University and author of Overpour, shares with us her current project and a few books of inspiration. She will be at MadArt at 7pm on Nov. 8 for the event “The Poetics of Haunting.”

Dear Readers,

My project, The Poetics of Haunting, considers how social, historical, and political contexts “haunt” the work of contemporary Asian American poets. How does history – particularly the history of war, colonialism, and marginalization – impact the work of Asian American poets across time and space? How does language act as a haunting space of intervention and activism? The digital site insists on invocation: a deliberate, powerful, and provocative move toward haunted places. It is my hope that you will explore the website, which features audio and video conversations, poetry, photographs, and multi-modal ephemera. And join me on November 8th, 7:00pm with poets Don Mee Choi, Pimone Triplett, and Diana Khoi Nguyen at MadArt for a powerful performance.

Below are a few of the books I am currently reading and returning to when I think about the poetics of haunting: Continue reading “Nightstand Reads: Jane Wong”

Nightstand Reads: Seattle author Sharon H. Chang shares from her bookpile(s)

Our guest blogger today is Sharon H. Chang, author of Raising Mixed Race: Multiracial Asian Children in a Post-Racial World. Sharon H. Chang is a writer, scholar and activist who focuses on racism, social justice and the Asian American diaspora with a feminist lens. She serves as a consultant for Families of Color Seattle and is on the planning committee for the Critical Mixed Race Studies Conference. Join us for her book talk, along with local mixed-race guest speakers and performers, on Thursday, September 29 at 7 p.m. at the Central Library.

Dear Readers,raising-mixed-race

First. Truth. I’ve got books on my nightstand but I don’t read at night. I mostly read in the early, early morning before the sun comes up; when the air outside is quiet, still and fresh; when cars are parked, the hustle bustle of the day hasn’t begun and most people are still sound asleep; most importantly my six-year-old son is still sound asleep. And I keep books all over the house. On my nightstand yes. But also on shelves, counters, in book bags, unopened and opened boxes, upstairs and downstairs, half-read, read twice, never read, will read later, reading now. In my head I have a rule “one book at a time, finish first then the next.” But in reality that never works out. There is – to simply put the simple truth – just too much exciting stuff to read and not always the perfect time to read it in.

So what’s in my for-the-morning nightstand/all-over-the-house piles right now? Continue reading “Nightstand Reads: Seattle author Sharon H. Chang shares from her bookpile(s)”

Nightstand Reads: Seattle mystery novelist Ingrid Thoft shares some favorites

Brutality_CoverOur guest blogger today is Ingrid Thoft, author of the Fina Ludlow mystery series (now in development as a series for ABC Studios) about a private investigator working with her three attorney brothers for her father’s maybe-shady Boston law firm. Brutality, the third in the series, comes out June 23. Start with Loyalty, move on to Identity, and get on the hold list for Brutality. In the meantime, here are Ingrid’s thoughts on some books she enjoys:

Old favorite: I’ve never gravitated toward short stories, but since I was a teenager, I’ve loved Trust Me by John Updike. The story centers on trust and betrayal and describes a man and his wife, who is a nervous flier. The man gazes out the window of an airplane and contemplates the rivets on the aluminum wing: “Trust me, the metallic code spelled out; in his heart Harold, like his wife, had refused, and this refusal in him formed a hollow space terror could always flood.” That’s not just flying—that’s life. Continue reading “Nightstand Reads: Seattle mystery novelist Ingrid Thoft shares some favorites”