#BookBingoNW2021 Small Press

Those who follow the literary world know the agglomeration of mega-publishers that was once termed the “big six” long ago became the “big five,” and through yet another merger/acquisition will soon become the “big four.” It seems just a matter of time before we’re talking about the “big one.” Fortunately, there are many many small publishers out there bringing a panorama of distinct editorial styles and missions to bookstore and library shelves. As you approach this Book Bingo square, you may want to browse this mega-list of small and independent publishers from our catalog. Here are just a few of my own favorites from this eclectic list:

Archipelago Books specializes in beautifully produced international titles, often in their English language debuts, making them a sort of United Nations of literature. Their big cash cow has been Karl Ove Knausgaard’s popular soul-searching six volume memoir My Struggle, the kind of commercial success that most small publishers dream of, and one that helps underwrite a wide range of other less profitable but no less fascinating titles. Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2021 Small Press”

Books by People You’ve Probably Never Heard of, Part III

It’s hard out there for young writers. The only houses that will house them are small, indie enterprises full of energy but lacking funds, and readers are scared by untested virtue. Be scared no longer sovereign readers! I will test your books for poison. Eat up!

Richard Yates by Tao Lin

What’s in a name? Behind Tao Lin’s lies a deep undercurrent of electronic press and radical polarization of literary critique. Some people love him, others do not. Whatever the case, you have to applaud his productivity. The back of his latest book, Richard Yates, says it’s about an illicit affair between a highschooler and a college grad, her 16 to his 22. The relationship itself is “pretty normal” while the modes in which it is actualized portray the 21st century as the real criminal in the lineup for its lack of scope and human body interaction amidst its complex web of mobile communication. Continue reading “Books by People You’ve Probably Never Heard of, Part III”

Books By People You’ve Probably Never Heard Of, Part II

It’s hard out there for young writers. The only houses that will house them are small, indie enterprises full of energy but lacking funds, and readers are scared by untested virtue. Be scared no longer sovereign readers! I will test your books for poison. Eat up!

The Orange Eats Creeps by Grace Krilanovich

There is no future for the self-proclaimed Slutty Teenage Hobo Vampire Junkies. Our narrator and her band of undead boyfriends tour the Pacific Northwest as the most ostracized of rejects. Revolving along the spokes of 7-11 parking lots and meth-head-hiding old growths, our narrator tumble-dries through consciousness searching for an unrelated sister who may or may not already be buried.  Continue reading “Books By People You’ve Probably Never Heard Of, Part II”

Books by People You’ve Probably Never Heard of, Part I

It’s hard out there for young writers. The only houses that will house them are small, indie enterprises full of energy but lacking funds, and readers are scared by untested virtue. Be scared no longer sovereign readers! I will test your books for poison. Eat up!

The Really Funny Thing About Apathy by Chelsea Martin

Ms. Martin would probably hate me for saying she needs to tweak her math (yes, there is math in this book, though small, paradoxical and funny math). She would also probably hate me for calling her Ms., but what she would probably most likely not hate is that I loved her words. Chelsea Martin writes about not getting life. Her characters think about “It”, sure, they try to connect the dots and fill in the bubbles, but they never get it. In one short, “McDonalds Is Impossible”, Chelsea invents a new twist on Zeno’s Paradox Continue reading “Books by People You’ve Probably Never Heard of, Part I”