New Digital Collection Highlights Lives of Seattle Pioneers

This month we’ve launched a new digital collection which reveals a glimpse into the personal lives of some of Seattle’s early pioneers. The Lu Jacobson Collection of Latimer and Denny Family Material includes materials focusing on Alexander Latimer, his wife Sarah Chesney Latimer and their five daughters: Narcissa Latimer Denny, Eliza Alice Latimer Fowler, Harriet Ellen Latimer Stephens, Clara Latimer Bickford, and Emma Chesney Latimer Reynolds.

Narcissa, Alice, Hattie, Clara, and Emma Latimer, circa 1880.

The descendants of the Latimer family played a significant role in the founding of Seattle. Alexander Latimer’s sister, Sarah Latimer, married her first husband, Richard Boren in 1822. Their children, Mary Ann Boren Denny, Carson Dobbins Boren and Louisa Boren, were in the group of Seattle’s first settlers who landed at Alki on November 13, 1851. They were accompanied by Arthur Armstrong Denny (husband to Mary Ann Boren Denny) and David Thomas Denny (soon to be husband to Louisa Boren). Arthur and David were the sons Sarah Latimer’s second husband John Denny from a previous marriage. Continue reading “New Digital Collection Highlights Lives of Seattle Pioneers”

New to our digital collections: Seattle’s Town Crier Newspaper

We’ve just added over 1,200 issues from Seattle’s local arts periodical, The Town Crier, to our digital collections. The Town Crier was a weekly magazine focusing on Seattle’s news, arts and culture between 1910 and 1938. Over its lifetime, the paper included coverage of the work of individuals such as Frank Kunishige, Edward S. Curtis, Ella McBride, Kenneth Callahan, Mark Tobey, Roi Partridge, Imogen Cunningham and more.

Every year, the paper produced a lengthier Christmas edition with a cover designed by a local artist featuring holiday articles, reproductions of photographs and artwork from local names, and lengthier features on topics such as Seattle homes, industries and history.

Continue reading “New to our digital collections: Seattle’s Town Crier Newspaper”

New to our Digital Collections: Seattle Mail and Herald

Want to explore Seattle headlines from over 100 years ago? Take a look at our new Seattle Mail and Herald digital collection. The Mail and Herald was a weekly paper discussing the city’s news, politics, society events, entertainment and more. The paper included articles on topics such as Seattle’s regrades, the Alaskan Gold Rush, the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, the Lake Washington Ship Canal, and the proliferation of crime and vice under Seattle’s “Open Town” policy. Issues often include portraits of prominent Seattleites and visiting entertainers along with photographs of buildings and scenery in Seattle, Washington State and Alaska. Continue reading “New to our Digital Collections: Seattle Mail and Herald”

Home for the Holidays

Have you ever wanted to explore the history behind some of Seattle’s unique bungalow homes? This month we launched a new digital collection featuring the iconic Bungalow Magazine that lets you do just that.

Bungalow Magazine was published in Seattle between 1912 and 1918 and features homes constructed in the Puget Sound region and other west coast locales. The founder and editor for the initial years was an entrepreneur named Jud Yoho. Yoho also served as the architect behind some of Bungalow’s featured designs. This magazine popularized the bungalow house form and the aesthetic of the Arts and Crafts Style as it was interpreted in the Northwest. Articles about particular houses in Seattle were regular features as well as measured drawings for inglenooks, sideboards, stools and other furniture. Some issues also include photographs taken by Webster and Stevens, a prominent local photography firm. Continue reading “Home for the Holidays”

New Ways to Research Neighborhood History

View up Washington St. into Tenderloin District from Jackson St. Wharf, ca. 1892, Seattle Historical Photograph Collection

Curious to learn more about your neighborhood’s past? This month, we’ve added a great new resource to our Neighborhood History Project – The Northwest Subject Index Collection. This collection contains selected cards from the Seattle Room Northwest Subject Index and Post-Intelligencer Index. These cards contain citations which point to books, newspaper articles and archival collections available for research on particular neighborhoods. Often you will find little descriptions of a neighborhood’s history or an accompanying article. If you look at the cards in order, you can establish a good timeline of each neighborhood’s story. Continue reading “New Ways to Research Neighborhood History”