Summer Reading: More Reviews from Ballard Readers

The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
O’Brien is drafted to go to war and he changes from an innocent adolescent to a war-hardened veteran.  ~ Amy

To Be Sung Underwater by Tom McNeal
This story dealt with coming of age and the main crossroads that change a life.  It made me think about love, loyalty and family, and wonder about different directions my life might have taken.                 ~ Barbara

The Ha-Ha by Dave King
This is a graceful, measured debut novel both sad and funny. The plot circles around a middle-aged Vietnam Vet, unable to speak, read or write due to head injuries suffered in the war. When Sylvia, the ex-high school girlfriend Continue reading “Summer Reading: More Reviews from Ballard Readers”

Summer reading: More reviews from readers at our Southwest Branch

Geek Love by Katherine Dunn
A cult classic I’d avoided because it seemed too grotesque – which it is – but it has an amazing level of depth and brilliance. Mind blowing! ~ Karen

Fate Is the Hunter by Ernest J. Gann
Commercial flying pre-World War II and events during war. If you think flying is scary now, check this out. ~ Jim

Bold Spirit by Linda Hunt
Non-fiction. True story about Helga Estby’s forgotten walk across Victorian America. Family and friends almost totally disowned her. She had hoped to earn enough money to save the family farm. ~ Charlotte

Hope: A Tragedy by Shalom Auslander
Sardonic, offensive and “hold your belly” funny. Picture a Holocaust theme where the reader is recommended to avoid HOPE. A terrific read! ~ Beatrice

I Was Amelia Earhart by Jane Mendelsohn
Fictional account of the heroine. Writing style is narrative, but a blend between past and present, and first and third person. Poetic.  ~ Anonymoys

Map of Bones by James Rollins
Adventure and mystery. Religious science fiction involving the magi. Quick read. Very enjoyable. Favorite new author. ~ Christie

The Witness by Nora Roberts
Very intriguing. Felt like you were running from mob. ~ Lillian

A Cat’s Diary: How the Broadway Production of Cats was Born by Stephen Mo Hanan
Fascinating snapshot of a former street performer and spiritual seeker as he prepares to bring Andrew Lloyd Weber’s phenomenon – Cats – to the Broadway stage. Decptively profound and touching rendering of a lightweight subject. Also a peek into gay life in NYC as AIDS was beginning to appear. ~ Helen

The Waikiki Widow by Juanita Sheridan
Written in 1953, a vintage Hawaiian mystery, with two engaging protagonists. Very entertaining.  ~ Susan

Still a few days to enter to win one of 20 Kindles we have to give away! Sign up online for our summer reading program for adults — or drop by a branch and fill out a quick review form. For each three books you read and review, we’ll enter you in a drawing for a Kindle.

Summer reading: Suggestions from readers on Queen Anne

The Spare Room by Helen Garner
Gripping story of woman’s fight with cancer, from the point of view of caregiver. Unusual, funny at times, great observation of characters and effect of the illness on all. ~ Florence

Prom by Laurie Halse Anderson
Laurie Halse Anderson does not disappoint! This book had me hooked and locked. B the end, the main character felt like my BFF. ~Bella

Shadow Tag by Louise Erdich
A well written, depressing story about a doomed marriage. Irene and Gil reminded me of moths drawn to a light that will destroy them. ~ Carolyn

Beauty Queens by Libba Bray
Beauty Queens is truly hilarious. Libba Bray makes you laugh and cry and portrays our very own lives in a new light. ~Cecilia

 Tough Customer by Sandra Brown
Her books are “no brainers” but good airplane reading. I found myself engaged with these characters—mother, daughter, estranged father—and how they worked out relationships. ~ Anonymous

The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery
Wonderfully French. Chapters alternate between a precocious 12-year-old girl and a middle-aged homely autodidact who works as a concierge in an apartment building. She lets few people in to her secret intelligence and quick wit. ~ Anonymous 2

What are you reading this summer? Sign up online for our summer reading program for adults — or drop by a branch and fill out a quick review form. For each three books you read and review, we’ll enter you in a drawing for a Kindle. We have 20 Kindles to give away to teen and adult readers this summer!

Summer reading: Reviews from readers in West Seattle

In the Kingdom of Men by Kim Barnes
I loved this book from start to finish, and now want to read everything else the insightful Barnes has written. Following Gin from the back hills of Oklahoma all the way to the streets of Rome captured my imagination. I sympathized with her then changed my mind as she changed hers. The men in her life helped me as well as hindered her. Gin’s sadness at the end of the story told of her learning that we all have to take the sweet with the sour, the rough with the smooth. People try (and often fall short in their attempts) to be the best human beings they can be. ~ Merrily

Confessions of a Prairie Bitch: How I Survived Nellie Oleson and Learned to Love Being Hated by Alison Arngrim
Having grown up watching every episode of Little House on the Prairie at least 20 times, I wholeheartedly enjoyed Nellie Oleson’s account of what her life was like growing up on a television set. ~ Carrie Ann

Head Over Heels by Rain Mitchell
This is for a yoga lover! L.A.’s beautiful people have lots of yoga studios to choose from. The story follows a few women as they make choices: good and bad, and practice yoga!  ~ Connie

 

What are you reading this summer? Sign up online for our summer reading program for adults — or drop by a branch and fill out a quick review form. For each three books you read and review, we’ll enter you in a drawing for a Kindle. We have 20 Kindles to give away to teen and adult readers this summer!

Summer Reading: Reviews from Rainier Beach Readers

Identity: Your Passport to Success by Stedman Graham
It’s Chicken Soup for the Soul meets a motivational roadmap. The concepts are all familiar but presented in a compelling way. ~Arleen

House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer
This futuristic sci-fi novel will enthrall audiences of most ages. Matt, the young clone of the wealthiest, most ruthless drug lord of opium, endures hardship and adventure as he learns more about the world around him. ~Nathan

Fifty Shades of Grey by E.L. James
Easy summer read. The story is intriguing, mostly for women. Leaves you dissatisfied at the end. ~ Stacey

The Next American Revolution by Grace Lee Boggs
According to the 95 year-old author, Americans consume much of the world’s resources. Therefore, Americans should learn to live simple so others around the world can just LIVE. ~ Betty

Defending Jacob by William Landay
Suspenseful and bad. A reality which could happen to any family. It is sensitive and shows the faith of family. ~ Kathy

What are you reading this summer? Sign up online for our summer reading program for adults — or drop by a branch and fill out a quick review form. For each three books you read and review, we’ll enter you in a drawing for a Kindle. We have 20 Kindles to give away to teen and adult readers this summer!