Book-It’s THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY: Beyond the Theatre

Poster that says: "The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde; adapted by Judd Parkin, Directed by Victor Pappas. June 6 - July 1, 2018. Logo at bottom right says "Book-It Repertory Theatre"Book-It Repertory Theatre presents THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY by Oscar Wilde, adapted by Judd Parkin and directed by Victor Pappas, from June 6 to July 1, 2018. Librarians at Seattle Public Library created this list of books, music and films to enhance your experience of the show. 

Oscar Wilde shocked Victorian sensibilities with his descriptions of Gray’s decadence and depravity. The book that scandalized readers was actually toned down from its original form. Book-It’s adaptation is drawn from Wilde’s original typescript, which you can read for yourself in the heavily annotated and illustrated The Picture of Dorian Gray: An Annotated, Uncensored Edition. Continue reading “Book-It’s THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY: Beyond the Theatre”

Bird Week: Shakespeare’s Birds

The Seattle Public Library is partnering with the Seward Park Audubon Center for Bird Week, April 23-30, in celebration of the center’s tenth anniversary and the National Audubon Society’s 2018 Year of the Bird.

Image of William Shakespeare, a bird is perched on his let arm. Text reads: Shakespeare, Illustration from "The Birds of Shakespeare," James Edmund Harting 1871

‘Tis unnatural,
Even like the deed that’s done. On Tuesday last,
A falcon, tow’ring in her pride of place,
Was by a mousing owl hawk’d at and kill’d.
~ Macbeth: Act 2, Scene 4

By coincidence, as we celebrate this Bird Week, it is also Bard Week, as in the birthday of Mr. William Shakespeare of Stratford-upon-Avon, a noted appreciator of the many qualities of birds. He was born April 23, 1564 according to most sources.

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Le Guin, Allende, Bradbury & More, This Spring at Thrilling Tales!

This Spring Thrilling Tales, the library’s popular story time for grown ups, is branching out with new monthly evening events in addition to our regular lunch hour gatherings. Now in its 15th year, the program celebrates the joy of story with live readings of compelling, intriguing, wondrous and suspenseful stories. Here’s what’s coming up in the months ahead.

Continue reading “Le Guin, Allende, Bradbury & More, This Spring at Thrilling Tales!”

Seattle Rep’s HERSHEY FELDER AS IRVING BERLIN: Beyond the Theatre

Seattle Repertory Theatre presents HERSHEY FELDER AS IRVING BERLIN from February 23 to March 18, 2018. Librarians at Seattle Public Library created this resource list of books, CDs, DVDs and musical scores to enhance your experience of the show.

“Alexander’s Ragtime Band” “Blue Skies” “Always” “Cheek to Cheek” “Puttin’ on the Ritz” “Easter Parade” “What’ll I Do” “How Deep Is the Ocean” “The Song Is Ended” “God Bless America” “White Christmas”…the list goes on and on…and on!  Irving Berlin was a tireless worker who wrote over 1500 songs – a staggering amount – and what’s even more remarkable than the sheer number of songs is the high quality of so much of his work.  Regardless of whether he was writing for the stage, for film, or stand-alone popular songs, he was a master songwriter (without ever having learned to read music).  From his birth in Russia in 1888 to his death at age 101, The Seattle Rep’s “Hershey Felder as Irving Berlin” explores the man behind all of this extraordinary music.

From the Rep’s synopsis:

From Imperial Russia to the streets of the Lower East Side, ACTOR AND PIANIST Hershey Felder takes us on a journey through “AMERICA’S COMPOSER” Irving Berlin’s incredible and fascinating life. Featuring Berlin’s most enduring tunes including “God Bless America” and “White Christmas,” this musical portrait is an uplifting IMMIGRANT TALE that breathes new life into THE AMERICAN DREAM.

Never mind Hallowe’en: Christmas is the Original Haunted Holiday.

It’s that time of year again – a time of ghosts and goblins, of sudden chills and flickering candle flames at the stroke of midnight, of frights and haunts and things that go bump in the night. No, this isn’t a leftover post from Hallowe’en. For the Victorians, the spookiest holiday of the year was Christmas. Here’s British writer Jerome K. Jerome in 1891:

“There must be something ghostly in the air of Christmas — something about the close, muggy atmosphere that draws up the ghosts, like the dampness of the summer rains brings out the frogs and snails… Nothing satisfies us on Christmas Eve but to hear each other tell authentic anecdotes about specters. For ghost stories to be told on any other evening than the evening of the twenty-fourth of December would be impossible in English society as at present regulated.”

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Continue reading “Never mind Hallowe’en: Christmas is the Original Haunted Holiday.”