Staying Healthy with Your Library: LGBTQ History & Culture

With materials from hundreds of institutions and organizations, including major international activist organizations, local, grassroots groups, and governments, the database LGBTQ History & Culture (also known as the Archives of Sexuality and Gender) collects an incredible set of primary sources for the historical study of sex, sexuality, and gender. Use this resource to investigate how sexual norms have changed over time, health and hygiene, the development of sex education, the rise of sexology, changing gender roles, social movements and activism, erotica, and many more topic areas.

screenshot of LGBTQ History & Culture homepagge

To access this database from your own device, sign in with your library card number and PIN, then select LGBTQ History & Culture from our list of Online Resources. Continue reading “Staying Healthy with Your Library: LGBTQ History & Culture”

Animal Crossing in Real Life

So, I hear you spent a lot of time at home during the quarantine. Same here – I was getting out, though, here and there. Chatting with neighbors, planting flowers, even travelling via plane – all from the comfort of my own home!

Like the vast majority of Nintendo Switch owners, I’ve been playing Animal Crossing New Horizons since it released back on March 20th. While I can say without a doubt that no one is enjoying living through a pandemic, finding little social loopholes like Animal Crossing has made it a little more bearable. For those who aren’t familiar, Animal Crossing is a franchise started by Nintendo in 2001. Since then, the franchise has had 4 additional main titles, 3 spin offs, and even an animated movie. Much like The Sims, Animal Crossing is considered to be a “social simulation” game. However, unlike The Sims, you and the friends you may be playing with in the game are the only humans. All the non player characters are anthropomorphic animals.

Animal Crossing
Animal Crossing. Photo courtesy of Jaz W.

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Staying Healthy with Your Library: ConsumerLab.com

Research and select the best quality health, wellness, and nutritional products, based on test results published by an independent laboratory with ConsumerLab.com. Since 1999, ConsumerLab.com has tested more than 5,600 products, representing nearly every type of popular supplement for adults and children (and yes Seattle, pets too).

To access this database from your own device, sign in with your library card number and PIN, then select ConsumerLab.com from our list of Online Resources.

Continue reading “Staying Healthy with Your Library: ConsumerLab.com”

The Odd World of the Tiger King

If you are like the rest of America, you may have seen the documentary “Tiger King” on Netflix.  The weird mix of true crime, eccentric characters, and cute tiger kittens left me wanting more. Get your quirky fix with these reads!

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#BookBingoNW2020: Nature

Today we unveil yet another Book Bingo category: nature. As someone who loves the outdoors as much as I love reading, I’m very excited for this square! Whether you’re a nature lover or not, here are some different ways to find a book that best suits your reading interests:

Think Local: If you’re taking daily walks around your neighborhood, you may be noticing local plants and animals more. Learn more about Emerald City wildlife with books from Seattle authors. Kelly Brenner’s fantastic Nature Obscura highlights creatures and plants in our urban environment that most of us overlook, from musk rats to lichens to dragonflies. Have you become an armchair birder during quarantine? Check out Lyanda Lynn Haupt’s thoughtful observations on ordinary birds like starlings and crows. UW wildlife professor John Marzluff has also written a modern classic on corvid behavior. And if you’re wondering how we’ll survive when the grocery stores run out of food, urban forager Langdon Cook has got some hot tips for you. Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2020: Nature”