What Your SeaFair Pirates Arrr Reading

When they’re not hoisting the Jolly Roger or broadsiding a parade crowd with their cannons, the Seafair pirates love to weigh anchor with a good book, just like the rest of us. When asked, they’ll admit that Readin’ is their favorite of the “Three Arrrs!” So here me hardies is a brace of the saltiest and swashbucklingest yarns found across the seven seas.

The Pirates! in an Adventure with Scientists, by Gideon DeFoe. We all know pirates enjoy a good laugh, and few nautical yarns are more hilarious than Defoe’s zany series of misadventures in which the likes of Charles Darwin, Karl Marx and Napoleon rub shoulders with the Pirate Captain and his motley crew of rapscallions and rascals, including my personal favorite: the pirate with the nut allergy.

The Bloody Black Flag: A Spider John mystery, by Steve Goble. What’s more fun that a treasure map? A mystery! In this debut, buccaneer sleuth Spider John attempts to solve the murder of his blood brother Ezra, with a ship full of pirates for suspects. The sequel is The Devil’s Wind.

A High Wind in Jamaica, by Richard Hughes. One of the strangest and most macabre voyages sets sail when a group of children are left to the mercy of a band of murderous privateers. Or is it the other way round? A long overdue pirates’ eye view of just how scary children can be!

A Glitter of Gold, by Liz Johnson. Don’t tell anyone, but pirates are suckers for a great love story! When Anne finds a golden sword hilt washed up in a hurricane’s wake, it sets her on a hunt for the real treasure: a happy ending.

Pirate Utopia, by Bruce Sterling. Cyberpunk pirate Lorenzo Secondari aims his radio-controlled airborne torpedoes at communists and capitalists alike. What if pirates ran the world? Who says they don’t!

We’ve just skimmed the surface here, and you’ll find these and many other pirate-approved titles right here in our catalog!

   ~ posted by David W.

Books for Two or More

There’s no need to go to the trouble of getting a large group together for a book group each month (unless you want to). I have a book group for two, sometimes more, and it’s going just fine. We get together once every two months to discuss our read.

My book group’s previous selection was French Exit: A Tragedy of Manners by Patrick deWitt:

Cover image of French Exit“Frances Price – tart widow, possessive mother, and Upper East Side force of nature – is in dire straits, beset by scandal and impending bankruptcy. Her adult son Malcolm is no help, mired in a permanent state of arrested development. And then there’s the Price’s aging cat, Small Frank, who Frances believes houses the spirit of her late husband, an infamously immoral litigator and world-class cad whose gruesome tabloid death rendered Frances and Malcolm social outcasts. Putting penury and pariahdom behind them, the family decides to cut their losses and head for the exit. One ocean voyage later, the curious trio land in their beloved Paris, the City of Light serving as a backdrop not for love or romance, but self destruction and economical ruin – to riotous effect.” (publisher description)

Continue reading “Books for Two or More”

Bus Reads for June

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time.

Here’s what I read on the bus in June:

Where the Crawdads SingCover of Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens
This felt like a book that will stick with me for quite a while. This book has so many layers and brought me into the story, never revealing itself fully until the very end. Kya Clark has lived in the marsh for years on her own. Shy and intelligent, the townsfolk only know her as the “Marsh Girl,” some even labeling her harshly as trash, letting rumors and gossip form the basis of their opinions. Abandoned by her mother, her siblings, and eventually her mean spirited father, Kya survives on her own learning the ways of the marsh and only interacting with a select few. She goes to Jumpin’ when gas for her boat is needed, the Piggly Wiggly when she can’t get supplies on her own, and also to Tate, a boy who teaches her to read and opens up her world to the future she will have. As her relationship with Tate turns into something more, she will find that same pattern of abandonment over and over again in her life, with the last instance being Chase Andrews, the golden boy of Barkeley Cove. When Chase is found dead and the law turns their eyes to Kya, the townspeople will have to decide if they will let their prejudice result in sacrifice of the “Marsh Girl”. Continue reading “Bus Reads for June”

Book-It’s BEHOLD THE DREAMERS: Beyond the Theatre

Imbolo Mbue’s thought-provoking and compassionate 2016 novel Behold the Dreamers follows the experiences of Jende and Neni Jonge, Cameroonian immigrants who are pursuing the American dream in New York City on the cusp of the 2008 financial crisis.

Book-It Repertory Theatre’s adaptation of Mbue’s BEHOLD THE DREAMERS, adapted and directed by Myra Platt, runs June 6 to 30, 2019. Here are a few books to enhance your experience of the show, with a longer list linked at the end of this post.
For other narratives that similarly shed a light on immigrants’ experiences in the United States, check out these novels and memoirs:

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Acclaimed Nigerian author Adichie offers a compelling depiction of globalization and immigrant life through the eyes of Ifemulu, a young Nigerian woman striving to build a life in America, and her friends and family. Continue reading “Book-It’s BEHOLD THE DREAMERS: Beyond the Theatre”

Bus Reads for May

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time.

Here’s what I read on the bus in May:

Bearskin by James A. McLaughlin
A nice little thriller, reminded me a bit of Josh Bazell’s book Beat the Reaper, which I also enjoyed. Rice Moore is seeking a hideout from the Mexican cartel he betrayed, he finds that in the Appalachian Mountains working on a nature preserve, but its not all peace and quiet. The bears protected on the preserve are found dead, while he searches for the poachers it brings him a little too close to the past he was running from.

Continue reading “Bus Reads for May”