#BookBingoNW2018: About the Environment

One of the many things I appreciate about the Book Bingo categories is that quite a few can be filled by both fiction or nonfiction, leaving the choice up to the reader. Today let’s look at the “About the Environment” category, which at first glance lends itself primarily to nonfiction, and instead see what fiction we could read.

Book cover image of When the Killing's DoneT.C. Boyle has written several novels in which environmental concerns play Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2018: About the Environment”

New fiction roundup – August 2018

This month’s roundup begins with a book that slipped past the July new fiction roundup, and continues on to the story of a dancer in the court of Korea’s last royal dynasty, a pregnant mistress on the run, a reclusive detective that comes down from the hills for one last case, and much more.

7/31: This Body’s Not Big Enough for Both of Us by Edgar Cantero – Twins Adrian and Zooey Kimrean couldn’t be more different: Adrian icily logical, Zooey impulsively creative. But they share a private investigator business, and also one body. Their new case has them tracking down the killer of a crime boss’s son.

8/7: The Court Dancer by Kyung-Sook Shin – In the final years of Korea’s Joseon Dynasty, orphan-turned-dancer Yi Jin is caught up in the dizzying sweep of court life.

8/7: The Last Hours by Minette Walters – When the Black Death enters England in June of 1348, Lady Anne decides to quarantine her estate of Develish, both nobility and serfs. When food stocks run low, tensions rise. Continue reading “New fiction roundup – August 2018”

#BookBingoNW2018: Award-Winning Authors

I’m sure you have heard of the Newbery Medal, Man Booker Prize, Hugo Award, and many, many other author awards. In addition to these well-known awards, let me introduce you to a few newer ones and their winning authors.

Black Caucus American Library Association (BCALA) Literary Award, established in 1994, recognizes African American authors in both fiction and nonfiction. Some of these outstanding works are listed below:

Grace by Natashia Deon follows the life of a runaway slave and her daughter. Deon’s writing is beautiful and gives you an intense conclusion. This won the Fiction Award in 2017.

The Other Wes Moore by Wes Moore was the Nonfiction winner in 2011. This fascinating book is a memoir of the author and also the story of another boy who grew up in a neighborhood nearby with the same name.

Chasing Utopia by Nikki Giovanni won the 2014 literary award by using simplicity and humor in this collection of poems that are part memoir.

Grace The Other Wes Moore Chasing Utopia

Continue reading “#BookBingoNW2018: Award-Winning Authors”

Bus Reads for July

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in July:

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas: One of the main themes I loved about this book was the character’s experience of being two different people in two different worlds and having to fight against the stereotypes of where you come from. This book is a must read. I’m so thankful it’s a YA novel; seriously, make this a part of every school curriculum! If you still find yourself struggling to understand and can’t see your privilege in the world we live in then read this. The hate you give is still out there and there is still so much work to do. So much to fight for! The movie will be released in October! Continue reading “Bus Reads for July”

Romance throughout American history

Happy 241st birthday, America! You don’t look a day over 240 years old. In honor of Independence Day, here are a few romances from some eras of American history that aren’t as beloved in the romance world as the Wild West or the Civil War, in chronological order.

Book cover image for Hamilton's BattalionHamilton’s Battalion by Courtney Milan,
Rose Lerner, and Alyssa Cole
This collection of historical romance novellas are all connected by one man: Alexander Hamilton. In Milan’s “The Pursuit Of,” a Black American soldier goes on a 500 mile walk and is joined by a motor-mouthed Redcoat, who knows that his companion’s silence can mean more than one thing. Rose Lerner’s “Promised Land” is the story of Rachel, a Jewish woman who disguises herself as a man to fight for America, only to come face to face with the man who broke her heart. And in Alyssa Cole’s “That Would Be Enough,” Mercy is Eliza Hamilton’s servant, helping Eliza’s quest to preserve her husband’s legacy. But when a bold dressmaker comes into the Hamilton household, Mercy must decide what’s more important: being safely alone or taking a chance on love. Continue reading “Romance throughout American history”