Top 10 Noteworthy 2019 Speculative Fiction Books Part 2

A continuation of our favorite speculative fiction works this year! So far…

The Future of Another Timeline by Annalee Newitz. Annalee Newitz just won a Hugo Award for the Our Opinions Are Correct podcast with their partner Charlie Jane Anders and is a writer of both science and science fiction. TFOAT is a fiercely feminist queer punk rock time travel novel that follows Tess, a time traveling geologist and her cohort of time travelers who are orchestrating a fine-tuned fight against a group of men hell-bent on stopping women’s rights from ever advancing. It’s the kind of science fiction that reminds us about how the future is happening right now and it’s up to us to collectively work towards better futures. Continue reading “Top 10 Noteworthy 2019 Speculative Fiction Books Part 2”

Top 10 Noteworthy 2019 Speculative Fiction Books Part 1

Even though it’s only October and there are still two more months left for publishing and reading in 2019 we are already assembling our “best lists”.

Here are some of our favorite speculative fiction works this year (so far):

The City in the Middle of the Night by Charlie Jane Anders. This is a science fiction novel steeped in the politics and prose of relationships. Humanity has arrived on a cold, tidally-locked planet, January, with searing sun rays on one side and constructed societies of survival in different pockets on the dark side of the planet with different rules and regulations. Sophie and Bianca, and the itinerant Mouth narrate the novel. Sophie is spellbound by Bianca, a beautiful girl from the ruling class with bold ideas about how to change the society they are in, intoxicating with out-sized personality and revolutionary dreams. This is a story of ecological consequences, humanity’s push and pull for control and freedom, our need to have someone to believe in, how our idea of the person we love may be quite different from the person they truly are, and how it is so hard to admit when we have been betrayed by a person we thought worthy of our trust. Continue reading “Top 10 Noteworthy 2019 Speculative Fiction Books Part 1”

Bus Reads for September

Commuting to Seattle by bus five days a week gives me a lot of reading time. Here’s what I read on the bus in September:

Circe by Madeline Miller. The story of Circe, the daughter of the sun god Helios, banished to an island for Zeus believes her to be a threat. Unlike other children of the gods Circe has her own power – that of witchcraft. On her island she focuses on her craft, turns evil visiting men into pigs (my favorite part), and encounters other major and minor characters in Greek mythology. The guest that makes the most impact is Odysseus. I really, really, really enjoyed this book however I felt like a complete idiot reading it – I didn’t realize how much I didn’t know about Greek mythology! Continue reading “Bus Reads for September”

New Fiction Roundup, July 2019

New titles this July include a fantasy novel inspired by Mexican folklore, a vision of southern Washington state in the early 20th century, a divided family brought together by brewing beer, and much more.

7/2: Deep River by Karl Marlantes – In this family saga, a set of Finnish siblings settle in a logging community and attempt to tame the Pacific Northwest, in an era defined by World War I and the rise of early labor movements.

7/9: The Need by Helen Phillips – Alone at home with her two young children, paleobotanist Molly is hearing strange noises that she dismisses. But when she finds what is making the noise, Molly wonders if her work has released a sinister force, or if she’s hallucinating her anxieties.

7/9: The Toll by Cherie Priest – In this gothic horror novel, newlyweds Titus and Melanie Bell are on their way through the Okefenokee Swamp when they cross a narrow bridge. After an unknown period of time, Titus wakes up lying in the middle of the road, but neither the bridge nor Melanie are anywhere to be seen. Continue reading “New Fiction Roundup, July 2019”

New Fiction Roundup, June 2019

No matter what kind of summer reader you are – romance, mystery, fantasy, historical fiction, general fiction – something is coming out in June for you to savor.

6/4: Ayesha at Last by Uzma Jalaluddin – In this contemporary take on Pride and Prejudice set in Toronto’s Muslim community, poet and teacher Ayesha is holding out for true love over an arranged marriage when smart, judgmental Khalid comes into her orbit.

6/4: City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert – 89-year-old Vivian reflects back on the years she spent living with her Aunt Peg in Manhattan, working at the Lily Playhouse theatre and living the single life, as well as the personal mistake she made that led to a professional scandal and changed the course of her life. A Peak Pick! Continue reading “New Fiction Roundup, June 2019”