Gift Books for Teens (You Only Kinda Know)

Gift books are a “thing”. They can be books that look awesome, box sets to keep readers satisfied, cutting edge content to sharpen their minds, – or some can be pretty, with unique covers or fancy bindings. Not saying that books should be all about looks, but when giving it as a gift this can help. Teens, as parents know, can be hard to shop for and don’t always communicate excellently about what they are enjoying (adults are honestly often just as difficult, but teens still get the bad rep). Here are some picks that will hopefully work for many a teen you need to buy a book for in the coming year!

La Belle SauvageHis Dark Materials series by Phillip Pullman is a well written and excellent fantasy that follows Lira as she navigates a prophecy that brings her far from her home at Oxford and puts everything she knows at risk.  The original series stars with The Golden Compass, a good pick for younger teens. The prequel series starts with the Book of Dust: Volume 1 – La belle sauvage, which works well for teens who have or haven’t read the original, but don’t want to focus on a 12 year old. Both are bigger books with fantastic covers – you can even find a single book that has the original trilogy in one! Continue reading “Gift Books for Teens (You Only Kinda Know)”

New Fiction Roundup, January 2020

Whether reading is part of your New Year’s resolutions, or already a tried-and-true habit, here are some new novels coming out in January 2020 to consider.

1/1: Lost Hills by Lee Goldberg – Recently promoted as the youngest female homicide detective in the history of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, Eve finds herself faced with a crime scene of horrific carnage, but curiously absent of bodies, with just her instinct to go on and a lot of people looking for her to fail.

1/7: The Heap by Sean Adams – In this near-future dystopia, a 500-story building has collapsed, becoming The Heap. Except there’s a survivor, Bernard, somehow broadcasting a radio show from inside the wreckage. Can his brother find him, or will corporate interest prevail?

1/7: Topics of Conversation by Miranda Popkey – This novel about sex, violence, and self-loathing consists of conversations between women over 20 years in the life of an unnamed narrator.

1/14: Cleanness by Garth Greenwell – An American teacher, living in Bulgaria, grapples with the intimate encounters that have marked his time abroad and reflects on a life transformed by the discovery and loss of love.

1/14: Followers by Megan Angelo – Budding novelist Orla and aspiring A-lister Floss come up with a plan to launch themselves using social media; 35 years later, government-appointed celebrities live every moment on camera, and one of them discovers a buried connection to Orla and Floss. Continue reading “New Fiction Roundup, January 2020”

Science Fiction for the Movie Based Fan!

I love science fiction – but realized recently that the genre is really different to read than it is to watch. I have two dozen favorite TV shows and movies that are all science fiction, but really struggle to find the same styles and pacing in books. However, I have recently come across some titles that will make many movie fans happy.

Record of A Spaceborn Few

I love a good close knit crew doing something difficult and seeing chosen families in space is always awesome. That’s why I loved Becky Chambers most recent installment Record of A Space Born Few, a sequel to The Long Way to A Small Angry Planet and A Close and Common Orbit, which takes us to the space born traditions of the descendants of earths survivors. Even as times change and folks move planet-side there is an aspect of losing culture that is rarely talked about in science fiction. Chambers writing has the right amount of detail while keeping the story moving forward. Continue reading “Science Fiction for the Movie Based Fan!”

Holiday Shopping Guide from Reader Services

Happy Holidays! Here are some of our 2019 favorites for the readers on your shopping list this year:

Edge of Your SeatAmerican Spy
The Last Woman in the Forest by Diane Les Becquets
The Last House Guest by Megan Miranda
American Spy by Lauren Wilkinson
Freefall by Jessica Barry
No Exit by Taylor Adams

Dysfunctional Families
The Cassandra by Sharma Shields
The Dutch House by Ann Patchett
The Grammarians by Cathleen Schine
Mostly Dead Things by Kristen N. Arnett
The Lost Man by Jane Harper

Unreliable Narrator The Need
The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides
They All Fall Down by Rachel Howzell Hall
Five Windows by Jon Roemer
Speaking of Summer by Kalisha Buckhanon
The Need by Helen Phillips Continue reading “Holiday Shopping Guide from Reader Services”

New fiction roundup, November 2019

No matter what you read – romance, fantasy, historical fiction, prize-winning fiction – November has a new release for you.

11/5: The Book of Lost Saints by Daniel José Older – In this multigenerational Cuban-American family story of revolution, loss, and family bonds, the spirit of a woman who disappeared during the Cuban Revolution visits her nephew to spur him into unearthing their family history.

11/5: The Deep by Rivers Solomon – The water-breathing descendants of African slave women tossed overboard have built their own underwater society, and must reclaim the memories of their past to shape their future.

11/5: Get a Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert – In this romantic comedy Chloe Brown – a chronically ill computer geek with a goal, a plan, and a list – recruits her mysterious, sexy neighbor to help her get a life.

11/5: Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo – The intersections of identity among an interconnected group of Black British women are portrayed in this 2019 Winner of the Booker Prize. A Peak Pick!

11/5: The Revisioners by Margaret Wilkerson Sexton – An elegant and historically inspired story of survivors and healers, of black women and their black sons, of female friendship, set in the American South. Continue reading “New fiction roundup, November 2019”