New Fiction Roundup, July 2019

New titles this July include a fantasy novel inspired by Mexican folklore, a vision of southern Washington state in the early 20th century, a divided family brought together by brewing beer, and much more.

7/2: Deep River by Karl Marlantes – In this family saga, a set of Finnish siblings settle in a logging community and attempt to tame the Pacific Northwest, in an era defined by World War I and the rise of early labor movements.

7/9: The Need by Helen Phillips – Alone at home with her two young children, paleobotanist Molly is hearing strange noises that she dismisses. But when she finds what is making the noise, Molly wonders if her work has released a sinister force, or if she’s hallucinating her anxieties.

7/9: The Toll by Cherie Priest – In this gothic horror novel, newlyweds Titus and Melanie Bell are on their way through the Okefenokee Swamp when they cross a narrow bridge. After an unknown period of time, Titus wakes up lying in the middle of the road, but neither the bridge nor Melanie are anywhere to be seen. Continue reading “New Fiction Roundup, July 2019”

New Nonfiction Roundup – July 2019

What’s new in nonfiction this July? Page-turning chronicles of crises close to home and abroad, women stepping out of the shadow of men, and a pair of graphic adaptations highlight the best this month has to offer.

Amazing DecisionsA graphic guide to making better decisions, from Dan Ariely (Predictably Irrational). 

America’s Reluctant PrinceHistorian Steven M. Gillon looks at the life and legacy of John F. Kennedy Jr.

American PredatorMaureen Callahan delivers a gripping true crime tale of serial killer Israel Keyes. Continue reading “New Nonfiction Roundup – July 2019”

Library Reads for July

Ten books coming in July that librarians across the US are loving.

The Bookish Life of Nina Hill by Abbi Waxman
Nina likes her bookish life just fine. She works in a bookstore and is on a highly competitive trivia team. She is funny and snarky and great company (says this reader). Suddenly, a father she never knew dies and leaves her with a pack of brothers and sisters and Nina may be forced out of her comfortable reading chair. For readers who enjoyed Waiting for Tom Hanks by Kerry Winfrey and The Bookshop by Penelope Fitzgerald.
Eileen Curley, Hagaman Public Library, East Haven, CT Continue reading “Library Reads for July”

New Fiction Roundup, June 2019

No matter what kind of summer reader you are – romance, mystery, fantasy, historical fiction, general fiction – something is coming out in June for you to savor.

6/4: Ayesha at Last by Uzma Jalaluddin – In this contemporary take on Pride and Prejudice set in Toronto’s Muslim community, poet and teacher Ayesha is holding out for true love over an arranged marriage when smart, judgmental Khalid comes into her orbit.

6/4: City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert – 89-year-old Vivian reflects back on the years she spent living with her Aunt Peg in Manhattan, working at the Lily Playhouse theatre and living the single life, as well as the personal mistake she made that led to a professional scandal and changed the course of her life. A Peak Pick! Continue reading “New Fiction Roundup, June 2019”

New Nonfiction Roundup – June 2019

100 Side HustlesChris Guillebeau features 100 stories of regular people launching successful side businesses.

Broken Places & Outer SpacesNnedi Okorafor examines how limitation and hardship in the lives of artists fuel their work.

Cult of the Dead Cow. Explores how one of the first group of hackers came to lead the charge for cyber security from Joseph Menn.

Definitely Hispanic. A collection of comedic and introspective essays by social media influencer Lejuan James about growing up Hispanic in the US.

Dignity. Photographer Chris Arnade presents portraits of America’s poor, drug-addicted, and forgotten, both urban and rural, blue state and red state. Continue reading “New Nonfiction Roundup – June 2019”